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Effective Interaction Techniques for Babies and Toddlers

a.How were the interactions between the children and the Educator initiated?

b.What information (knowledge) did the Educator provide the children during this interaction?

c.How did the Educator sustain the interaction?

a)What did the Educator do to initiate interactions with Ollie?

b)What did the Educator do to engage Ollie in conversation?

c)How does the Educator help Ollie to feel secure?

8.Read the scenario below and answer the related questions.

a.What does the Educator do to make every child feel ‘special’ and included?

b.How does the Educator engage the children in the story time session?

c.Explain why the Educator does not ask Milly to sit down but allows her to stand nearby?

d.The Educator has a system which allows each child in turn to suggest a song/rhyme for the group to sing.

9.How do the Educators demonstrate Element 5.1.1 Interactions with each child are warm, responsive and build trusting relationships?

10.How do the Educators demonstrate Element 5.1.2? Every child is able to engage with Educators in meaningful, open interactions that support the acquisition of skills for life and learning?

11.Match each of the following Educator strategies with how it supports the development of positive relationships.

12.Match each scenario to the most appropriate Educator strategy for supporting toddler’s emotional development.

13.The following photographs show children engaged in typical play experiences.

14.Look carefully at the examples of Educator’s engaging with children in their play and answer the related questions.

a.Explain how the interaction in Scenario A will assist James to formulate a plan to complete the puzzle.

a.Explain why is it important for the Educator to show enjoyment in the company of the children?

a.Explain how the Educator supports Rory as a competent and curious learner?

b.Tick the four statements that describe the Educator interactions in the above series of photos.

15.Quality Area 6 of the National Quality Standards provides educators with guidelines and instruction on how to establish and maintain effective relationships with children and families and how to reflect the culture and practices of their local community.

16.List the five guidelines given in relation to how services provide care and education for children in Regulation 155: Interactions with children.

17.What instruction is given in Regulation 156: Relationships in groups?

18.Children will show signs of distress in different ways and the Educator’s response should be adjusted to suit the needs of individual children. For each of the following examples, suggest an appropriate Educator response.

Expanding Communication and Sustaining Conversations with Toddlers

19.Read the following scenarios and for each one describe how you could support the child and respond in a way that acknowledges the child’s skills/abilities whilst, at the same time, promoting or protecting their self-esteem.

21.List five considerations Educators should make when organising the environment and resources in a manner which will reduce children’s stress and frustration?

22.List five daily management strategies Educators can use to support pro-social behaviour and help prevent children’s stress and frustration.

23.Children will remember, and learn from consequences they have actually experienced. In this case there really is no need for Educators to add to the stress or frustration the child is feeling but it is much more constructive and positive to show understanding and support for the child – building a positive, respectful relationship.

Ravi continues to kick the ball into the fence and, sure enough, it goes over! The educator says “Oh dear. That’s a shame. No more soccer game, eh?”

a.Read the above scenario and comment on whether the Educator’s response was good or not and why?

b.24.Read each statement and:

i.Suggest the most appropriate Educator response (you may choose more than one) from the list below.

ii.Give a reason for your choice of strategy – you should draw on your knowledge of child development.

25.Name the Quality Area that relates to children’s behaviour from the NQS?

26.In reference to the EYLF name the Learning Outcome and Indicator that relates to Children’s behaviour?

27.Educators need to be careful not to ‘reward’ inappropriate behaviour. Sometimes, our responses to a behaviour do, in fact, allow the child to achieve their goal, which may be to avoid something or to get extra attention. Read the following scenarios and use the table below to document your responses to the following questions:

28.Read the scenarios and answer the related questions.

a.How could the Educator in the Scenario ‘Thomas’ respond to help the children manage their emotions?

a.Read the scenario and suggest how the Educator should respond to help the children manage their emotions?

29.The strategies listed below are some of the ways we can guide children’s behaviour positively. For each strategy briefly explain, in your own words, what each one means.

30.Read the Scenario and answer the related questions.

a.Identify the quality practices being used by Lisa and the staff at this centre?

b.What do you think Lisa would do next in this discussion?

c.Identify the benefits from this type of approach to behaviour management.

Effective Interaction Techniques for Babies and Toddlers

The aim of this assessment is to assess your skills and knowledge that are required for this unit. Use the Learning Resources that the Trainer provides you and also your Trainer to assist you in completing this booklet with accuracy.

This section of the assessment incorporates the unit scope, underpinning knowledge, critical aspects and the appropriate employability skills. This assessment can be given as a self-paced written assessment, administered orally by an assessor or a combination of both. Whichever method is used, the answers to the questions will be recorded on this assessment schedule.

The Student must complete ALL questions correctly. If an answer is not correct, the Assessor must investigate the level of understanding. The Assessor will then document any discussions in the Assessor Box provided at the bottom of each page. If the Assessor asks any additional questions, these will be documented in the Assessor Box and include the Student's answer.

If the Student does not demonstrate the required underpinning skills and knowledge, then the Student is deemed not yet competent in this unit. Some possible solutions to achieve competence are:

  •    Any incorrect questions may need to be completed again and re-submitted
  •    Additional training may be required
  •    Additional research may be required

To be completed by the Student)

1.Each of the strategies listed below demonstrate effective interaction techniques Educators use when responding to and communicating with babies and toddlers.

In the table below, match each scenario to the strategy the Educator is using.

Scenario Effective Interaction Strategy

(d) Kai says “Dat a tat”

Educator: “Yes, that’s right Kai that is a cat.” a.Repeat and reinforce verbal communication.

(b) The Educator sits Thomas (5 months) facing her on her lap.

Educator says “Hello Thomas, Have you had a nice sleep?”

Thomas babbles.

Educator responds, “Oh that’s so interesting Thomas.”

The Educator pauses before saying, “Are you ready for a drink?”    b.Make eye contact, take turns in back- and-forth conversation.

(a) Mattie says “Me put dolly to bed.”

Educator responds, “That’s right, Mattie, you did put the doll to bed.”   c.Use non-verbal communication to encourage communication.

(c) The Educator smiles and nods her head in response to babies’ facial gestures. d.Model correct language rather than correcting errors.

2.Each of the strategies listed below demonstrate effective interaction techniques Educators use when expanding communication and sustaining conversations with toddlers.

In the table below, match each scenario to the strategy the Educator is using.

Scenario Effective Interaction Strategies

(b) The Educator points to the helicopter as it comes into sight, “Look Saqr, a helicopter!”   a.Link words with child’s actions.

Expanding Communication and Sustaining Conversations with Toddlers

(c) Educator gives clear instructions “Put the book on the shelf please Ben’ and ‘Put the doll in the basket.” b.Look at, point to and label objects.

(d) Educator “That’s right Aidan, the key goes in the lock. Good thinking!”    c.Use shorter phrases with toddlers to assist understanding.

(a) Educator “Are you putting the teddy under the bed Tilly?”    d.Link language and thinking.

3.Each of the strategies listed below demonstrate effective interaction techniques Educators use when engaging positively with preschool aged children.

In the table below, match each scenario to the strategy the Educator is using.

Scenario Effective Interaction Strategies

(c) Educator says to Mitch (4 years) “Tell me Mitch, how did you make your garage?” a.Ask open-ended questions to encourage conversation.

(d) As Perri (4 years 5 months) is talking about her weekend visit to Nanny and Poppys. The Educator looks at Perri, nods, smiles and occasionally makes a comment. b.Provide children with specific feedback about their actions.

(a) Educator says to Kip (4 years 3 months) “How did you know how to do that?”    c.Encourage child to describe their ideas or actions.

(b) Educator says to Sari (3 years 9 months) “Sari I like the way you’ve used all of the blue dots to decorate the roof.” d.Model active listening skills.

4.Write what you could say in response to the following children’s attempts to communicate with you.

What the child said What would you say?

“Guess what. My mum got a new car.” “What does it look like? What is the colour of the car? Could you please describe it to me?”

“I’m looking for a big piece of blue paper.” “Let us both try to find it. Hope that would get you the piece of paper in a shorter time. Did you look for it at the study table?”

“Do you think there are fairies in our garden? My dad says there’s no such thing as fairies.” “The existence of the fairies has been under question. They might or might not exist in this world. We could do something. We could try to find out whether the fairies do exist. Thus, we could even find out whether your father is right. What do you think, should we?”

“My Grandpa had another heart attack.” “That was such a sad news. We should pray to God for his recovery. Do not worry they say God listens to the prayers of His loved ones.”

Elements of NQS and EYLF

“Look what I’ve made with the playdough. It goes round and round.” “that is wonderful. The playdough helps you to create any shape that you like. Let us try to make some more. You can even make a cube out of it or a star. Do you want to try and make them too?”

Assessor Notes:

5.Rewrite each question so that it’s an open-ended question, inviting more than a single word response.

Question Open-Ended Question

What colour is your new bike? Tell me about your new bike.

Are you helping mummy with your baby brother? Tell me about your baby brother and your mother.

Do you want ham and pineapple on your pizza? Tell me how do you like your pizza.

Can you see the airplane? Tell me about the airplane that you see.

Are the tomatoes ready to pick? Tell me about the tomatoes ripening.

Did you have a nice weekend with Nanny and Poppy? Tell me about the weekend that you spent with Nanny and Poppy. Did you enjoy?

Can your dog do tricks? Tell me about your dog. I would like to hear more about your furry friend.

6.Read the scenario below and answer the related questions

Where are the Chickens

Ellie: “We can’t see the chickens.”

Hannah: “I think they must be asleep.”

Ellie: “Can we look in their house?”

Educator: “We sure can, as long as we are very quiet so that we don’t frighten them.”

Educator: “I’ll open the door very quietly.”

Ellie: “There they are. They’re not asleep. What’re they doing?”

Educator: “What do you think they’re doing Hannah?”

Hannah: “I think they’re just relaxing in their bedroom.”

Ellie: “Yeah!”

Ava: “Now they’re going downstairs.”

Educator: “Let’s close the door and go around the other side so that we can see them.”

Ellie: “Here they come. Hello chickens. We can see you now!”

Ava: “They’re having their breakfast. We putted some food in there for them before.”

Educator: “Yes, I saw you putting their food pellets on the straw for them to peck.”

Hannah: “Their food smells!”

Educator: “I wonder what sort of food is in their pellets.”

Ellie: “Well I think it must be grass ‘cause they peck the grass.”

Educator: “Good thinking Ellie.”

Hannah: “I think it might be poo. (everyone giggles)”

Educator: (laughs)” It does smell a bit like poo.”

Ellie: “I think it might be seeds ‘cause at my Poppy’s we give them seeds.”

Regulations for Interactions and Relationships

Educator: “Maybe those seeds are wheat. You’ll have to ask your Poppy Ellie. Maybe your Poppy will let you bring some seeds in to show us.”

Hannah: “I’m glad we don’t have to eat chicken pellets!”

a.How were the interactions between the children and the Educator initiated?

The interaction between the children and the educator were initiated through a condition wherein the children had put forth their wish to have a look at the chickens. The educator had introduced herself into the scenario and helped the students to have a closer look at the chicken.

This type of initiation of the conversation helps the children to take active part in the conversation that has been going on. This in turn would help the children to open up to their peers and their teachers on the topics that they might interest them.

b.What information (knowledge) did the Educator provide the children during this interaction?

The educator is seen to open the enclosure wherein the chicken had been present. She points out to the children that they should be quiet enough and careful so that they might not scare the chicken who had been present in that shelter. The children seem to be excited to have a look into the daily activities that the chickens are involved in. The educator provides them with an insight into the daily activities of the chickens from a backdoor that is situated in the rear side of the shelter. The educator provides them with the information that they need while allowing them an insight into the shelter. The educator provides the students with the further information about the food that should be offered to the chicken. The educator also helps the students to put forth their thoughts on the content of the food that is offered to the chicken. The educator is observed to be awarding a child with recognition when the child puts forth the fact that the chicken food pellets might contain grass on the basis of her observation. The educator tends to keep the conversation lively by agreeing to the fact that the food pellets that have been offered to the chicken do smell bad. The educator also shares information with the students regarding the type of food that might be present in the food pellets. The educator suggests that the seeds that might be offered to the chickens might be wheat seeds and asks the concerned student to bring some to class so that the other children might also have a look at them.

Strategies for Positive Behavior Management

c.How did the Educator sustain the interaction?

The educator is observed to have been encouraging the students with the ideas that they have been putting forth through their conversation. The educator seems to put forth some information that might help the children to continue with the conversation that they have been involved with. The educator is observed to have been putting forth the information that the students might be needing about the daily activities in the life of a chicken.

7.Read the scenario below and answer the related questions.

The Educator lifts Ollie up above her head. “Hello beautiful boy.” Ollie laughs, “You like that don’t you. You like being up in the air!”

The Educator sits Ollie on her lap and continues to talk to him. “Your mummy said you kept her awake all night. Ollie laughs. Oh you think that was funny do you Ollie? I don’t think mummy thought it was funny. Did you have a pain in your tummy Ollie?  You’ll have to have a big sleep today so that you’re nice and relaxed tonight.”

As the Educator talks to Ollie she pauses, waits for him to respond and then continues. As she is talking Ollie babbles and smiles at the Educator.

“Look Ollie here’s the caterpillar. You like the caterpillar don’t you. It makes crunchy sounds.”

Ollie laughs and grasps the caterpillar.

a)What did the Educator do to initiate interactions with Ollie?

The educator, in this case, maintained an eye contact with Ollie. This helped the educator to hold the attention of the toddler. The educator lifts the toddler to a certain height and then brings him down again this swinging action helps the educator to establish a certain connection with the toddler. The toddler is seen to be enjoying the company of the concerned educator and is comfortable around her. This helps the educator to continue with the interaction with the toddler, Ollie and thus making attempts to initiate communication from the toddler too.

b)What did the Educator do to engage Ollie in conversation?

The educator initially lifts Ollie over her head and then brings him back down to her lap. This creates a certain sensation in the toddler that leads him to laugh. The educator then settles him down onto her lap and continues to interact with him which earns the educator some more laughs and giggles from the toddler. The educator gives Ollie a chance to reciprocate to her words by stopping in the middle of the conversation. The toddler, Ollie, responds to this silence by babbling and smiling at the educator. The educator then attempts to help Ollie to get involved with this play things by helping him reach out to them. The toddler reciprocates to this too by laughing and grasping at the toy. This indicates the cordial relationship that exists among the educator

c)How does the Educator help Ollie to feel secure?

The educator helps Ollie to feel secure by placing him on her lap before continuing with the interaction. The toddler experiences security in the firm grip of the educator when she tosses him into the air before bringing him down to her lap. The constant interaction of the educator helps the toddler to find the much-needed sense of security which keeps him comfortable and smiling. The babbling of the toddler indicates that the toddler is comfortable  around the educator.

8.Read the scenario below and answer the related questions.

Every day before lunch the Educator gathers the children together in the 3’s room to read stories and sing songs/rhymes. The Educator knows that this has a calming effect on the children and allows them to settle down for the afternoon period.

Before she begins her story the Educator comments about the morning program. “We’ve had a very busy morning. I saw Jonty and Ellam and Cooper, building roads in the sandpit. I saw Nell and Maisy climbing to the top of the climbing frame.” (The Educator continues until each child has been mentioned).

Today the Educator reads a favourite, “Where’s the green sheep?” The children happily join in the story.

Next the Educator uses a range of picture props for the monkey rhyme which the children also love – they shout out the repetitious section of the rhyme on cue.

As the Educator is working with the children she uses a range of tones in her voice and uses a number of different facial expressions.

The Educator also makes eye contact with the children as she scans the group.

When Milly stands and moves closer to the lounge the Educator simply continues with the story. Milly has just moved up to the 3’s room from the 2’s group.

When children make comments or talk to others the Educator continues as she knows the children will return their attention to her.

To conclude the session the Educator asks Callum to nominate a song to sing. “Callum, it’s your turn today to pick a song for us to sing. Can you think of what song you would like?” Callum does not immediately so other children begin to make suggestions.

Educator: “Thank you for all your good ideas. That might help Callum as he’s thinking.”

Callum then says, “Let’s sing the cowboy song!”

Educator: “Great choice Callum!”

a.What does the Educator do to make every child feel ‘special’ and included?

The educator, in this case, helps all the children in the class to feel included by mentioning them in the section wherein she comments on the morning program wherein the students had been involved. In this case, the educator is seen to have been greatly observant of the actions that the concerned children had been participating in since long. The mention of their names by the educator tends to provide a sense of inclusion for the child. The educator also maintains the nonverbal mode of communication with the concerned students. The educator is observed to be maintaining a constant eye-contact with the students which helps them feel special to the class. This also points out the fact that the teacher is attentive towards all the children who have been present in the class. The educator also ensures that all the children have their turn to contribute to the class.

b.How does the Educator engage the children in the story time session?

The educator tends to incorporate every child present in the room in the activities that take place during the story time session. The educator uses the props that the children find interesting. The educator also tends to include the students in the daily activities of the classroom. The educator is observed to have chosen one of the students for the activity of singing which is one of the concluding activities of the classroom. This involvement tends to engage each and every child who is present in the classroom.

c.Explain why the Educator does not ask Milly to sit down but allows her to stand nearby?

Milly, as per the given case, is a child who has just moved up to the room dedicated for the 3’s from the group of 2’s. The educator might believe in the fact that she would need time to adjust to the scenario in this room. The child might need time to adjust in the new environment and make friends. Thus, the educator tends to keep a watch out for her but allows her the independence that she needs to get accustomed to the rest of the class. This action of the educator might help the concerned child to familiarise herself with the immediate surroundings. Milly, the child in this case, has just been introduced to the particular classroom that has been described here and thus would require more time to adapt to the environment that is prevalent in the concerned class.

d.The Educator has a system which allows each child in turn to suggest a song/rhyme for the group to sing. How does this support the children’s sense of belonging?

The educator, in this case, is seen to have a way of getting all the students of the class involved in the activities of the class. The educator is observed to nominate one among all the children of the class to decide on the song or the rhyme that is to be sung or recited at the conclusion of the class duration. This helps the students to form a sense of belonging in the class. The educator is seen to allow the child time enough to suggest the song or the rhyme that he or she might choose for the class. She does not encourage the fact that the other members of the class would help the student who has been nominated. This helps to instil in the concerned student a sense of importance and makes the concerned student feel special for the day. The educator, however, does not push the concerned student for replying to the question within a stipulated time. She allows the student time enough to contemplate on the question and then come up with the song or the rhyme of his choice.

9.How do the Educators demonstrate Element 5.1.1 Interactions with each child are warm, responsive and build trusting relationships?

The educators in all the above-mentioned cases tend to demonstrate the fact that the interactions that they have with each child should demonstrate the warmth, the responsiveness and the building up of the relationships on the basis of trust between the children and the concerned educator. The children in all the concerned cases do belong the age group of toddlers and pre-schoolers. These children tend to be dealt with warmth in order to help them to get accustomed to the ways of the education and this adapt themselves. The educators who are involved with these children need to be more patient with them and make attempts to get the children involved in the conversation that they might hold.

The educator, in the first case, demonstrates the ability to keep the children engaged in the conversation and imparting knowledge to them while attending to their playful activities. The responsiveness of the educator is depicted by the fact that she tends to encourage the students to come up with the answers to the questions that are put forth by their peers.

The second case depicts an educator who has been involved with a toddler who is still in his babbling stage. In this stage of development of the child, it is necessary to help the child build a trustworthy relationship with the concerned educator. The sense of security at the hands of the educator is very important for the development of the child in these stages. The toddler, in the given case, is observed to be very comfortable in the company of the concerned educator. He is seen to be enjoying the company of the educator and responding to the educator through his babbling.

The third case depicts a situation wherein an educator is seen to be interacting with a group of pre-schoolers. In this case the educator is seen to be very responsive to each of the children who have been attending the class. The educator, in this case tends to involve all the students in the class by initially talking about her observations of the activities of all the children during the period prior to her class. The educator also maintains the eye contact with each of the children which tends to put across the message that she is responsive to all the actions that they have been taking part in during the class hours. The educator is also observed to allow the children their own personal space and time to get accustomed to the environment of the classroom. The educator is seen to allow the students to take their own time to come up with the answers to the questions that have been put forward to them. The child who has been addressed at the end of the class tends to take up much more time than is usual to come up with the suggestion. In this scenario, it might be observed that the other children tend to suggest an array of songs and rhymes but the educator displays the patience and allows the concerned child to come up with the suggestion that he had been asked or. The educator also shows a high level of appreciation for the concerned students. This in turn might help the concerned students to develop a warm and comfortable relationship with the educator in the initial days of his or her academic life.

10.How do the Educators demonstrate Element 5.1.2? Every child is able to engage with Educators in meaningful, open interactions that support the acquisition of skills for life and learning?

The educators in all the above cases are observed to have ensured the fact that all the children have scope enough to interact with the educator. The educator should ensure the fact that the children have scope enough to interact liberally and put across their doubts and thoughts to the educator. In all the above cases, the children are seen to be interacting freely with the educator and their peers.

In the first case, the children are seen to be interacting with the educator and among themselves about the daily activities in the life of a chicken. The topic of the discussion, however, shifts to the food pellets that have been offered to the chickens as food. One of the children is observed to be sharing a memory that he has formed at his home. This tends to be helpful information for the entire class. The educator in this case is seen to encourage the interaction by asking him to bring some of the food that they offer to the chickens back at their place. This helps the educator to encourage the interaction among the students and those that the students would hold with her.

In the second case. It might be observed that the educator tends to encourage the toddler, Ollie, to communicate with her. She tends to do so by maintaining the eye contact and other nonverbal modes of communication. She quietens up for some time which proves to be effective in helping the toddler to open up to the conversation. The toddler tends to babble when he does not find the educator talking to him. This ensures that the toddler engages in a meaningful interaction with the educator. The nonverbal interaction among the educator and the toddler tends to help the concerned toddler to acquire the non-verbal skills of communication that might help him in his future life to come.

In the third case is observed that the educator is surrounded by the children who have gathered together for a story telling class. The educator tends to put forth a condition wherein the children would be encouraged to interact with her by describing her observations of all the children who have been present in the class. She names each and every one of them which ensures that the children might come up with some more information that they might find necessary to share with the educator and the entire class. The educator tends to involve all the students by using the various props that they might find to be interesting. The educator also tends to put forth an area of open interaction by nominating one child for choosing a song or a rhyme that would be sung or recited at the end of the story reading class. The educator in this case too is found to maintain the nonverbal communication with the children. This tends to indicate that the educator is attentive and responsive towards each child. This helps the children present in the class to acquire the various skills that are necessary for their future academic and social lives.

Assessor Notes:

11.Match each of the following Educator strategies with how it supports the development of positive relationships.

Educator’s Strategy How it supports development

(e) Recognising and responding promptly to a child’s emotional cues. a.Allows children to have a sense of control over their environment and to anticipate routines before they occur.

(c) Responding to and comforting children when they are upset or hurt. b.Children need support to understand that each person is entitled to express their feelings (in a socially acceptable manner) even if these feelings are different to their own.

(d) Providing predictable and consistent routines that allow the child to feel a sense of security. c.Ensures the child know that the adult is sympathetic to their needs and is emotionally available to respond to these needs.

(b) Talking about feelings and the feelings of others. d.Supports the child’s development of trust and sense of security.

(a) Helping children to express their emotions in socially acceptable and age-appropriate ways. e.Helps children understand that others experience feelings similar to their own.

Scenario Strategy

(b) Toddlers Cam and Zen are screaming ‘mine’. Both have their hands on a truck, and both want it. a.Gently encourage and support self-control.

(e) Pran (16 months) often takes food from others during morning teas and lunch. Today he has managed to get through lunch without taking food from others. b.Educator intervenes and spends time playing with children.

(d) Liam (2 years 7 months) likes to attempt to dress/undress himself. This can take quite a long time. c.Promote positive behavior by having realistic expectations.

(a) Kirra (20 months) is trying unsuccessfully to dress the doll. She is becoming increasingly frustrated and starts to stamp her feet. d.Avoid hurrying children.

(c) Misha (10 months) tips the contents of her plate onto the floor. e.Catch children when they are behaving well.

12.Match each scenario to the most appropriate Educator strategy for supporting toddler’s emotional development.

13.The following photographs show children engaged in typical play experiences.

For each experience write one open-ended question and one suggestion that could be used to encourage continued conversation/interaction.

Over the fence: The Educator holds the ladder while Cory looks over the fence. Question:

Please tell me about the view on the other side of the fence.

Are you comfortable up there Cory?

The educator might encourage the continuation of the interaction by asking Cory to describe the view on the other side of the fence. The educator could inquire about the animals and the trees that are visible on the other side of the fence and whether Cory wants to visit the place. The educator might also question whether Cory might count the number of animals on the other side of the fence. The educator might also inquire about the comfort of Cory as he is standing on the ladder.

You did hide in a place that was not easy to find. Who gave you the idea to hide here?

Why do you not try the spaces behind the walls and the doors next time?

The educator might point out the fact that the concerned hideout was not easy to find. The educator might also put forth the fact that he or she had been searching for the children for a long time and had been worried about them. The educator might also suggest a place that might be easier for the educator as well as the other children to access. The educator might also put forward some suggestions on the places where the children might hide in the future, for example, behind the walls or the doors.

Dinosaurs: Anshul creates a dinosaur habitat. Question:

This seems to be greatly interesting, Anshul. Could you please tell me more about this project that you have undertaken? Please tell me more about what you are about to do next.

Can you please tell me more about the days of the dinosaurs, the forests that existed during that time?

The educator might praise the work that Anshul had been doing. He or she could advise Anshul to add some more features like some more wood on the ground and some more trees to produce the look of a dense forest. The educator could also ask Anshul about the ideas that he has about the lands and forests that might have existed during those primitive ages and thus impart knowledge while helping Anshul in his creativity.

Do you want to include some vegetables in the bowl of spaghetti that you have been making?

The educator could suggest Rukan to add some more ingredients to the spaghetti to make it tastier. The educator could advise Rukan to add some shells to the spaghetti considering the shells to be the various vegetables that are generally found in the spaghetti.

Drew (18 months) piles the rocks together.

Drew that is a commendable piece of art that you have been making. Can you please explain what have you been planning to make with those rocks?

Would you like to make a castle with those small rocks over there?

The educator could put forth some suggestions to Drew for the correct manner of stacking the rocks. The educator could also provide Drew with some of the details on the various castles and how they look like while engaging in the activity of stacking the rocks with Drew.

14.Look carefully at the examples of Educator’s engaging with children in their play and answer the related questions.

The Educator is encouraging James to look closely at the picture of the puzzle before attempting to complete it. The Educator asks James a series of questions as they explore the picture of the Eiffel Tower. The Educator refers to colours, shapes, outline, lines, top, bottom and sides.

a.Explain how the interaction in Scenario A will assist James to formulate a plan to complete the puzzle.

This interaction would help James to have a better idea about the various features of the Eiffel Tower. The puzzle of the Eiffel Tower becomes easier to solve for the concerned child once the child becomes well versed with the picture of the same. The question and answer session that the educator conducts before the commencement of the puzzle game tends to help the students to learn about the various aspects of the Eiffel Tower that might help him to memorise the shapes, colours, outlines, the sides, the top and the bottom of the architecture. These questions that are shared by the teacher helps the child, James, in this case, to form a better understanding of the picture. This in turn would help the child to solve the picture puzzle in a better manner and thus help the child to complete the puzzle faster and in a better manner. The accurate completion of the puzzle also helps to boost the confidence of the child. This might help the child in the longer run to devise a plan for the completion of the picture puzzles in the future.

The Educator is playing alongside Cooper. The Educator has taken on the role of doctor and is examining the doll who Cooper says needs an operation on her head.  

Educator: “I’ll just listen to her heartbeat with the stethoscope. Mmm, not sounding too good. I think you may be right Cooper. She may need an operation. Have you checked her temperature?”

a.Explain how the Educator in Scenario B is supporting Cooper’s ideas and learning in this role-play situation?

In this given situation, the educator is found to be involved in the role play with the concerned child. This might help the child to develop the skills that are needed to recognise the various medical conditions. This interaction with the educator in the role play game helps the concerned child to learn more about the conditions that the doctors might have to deal with. These role-play games also help the children to know about the basic first aid that they might need to practice in times of emergencies. The roleplay also teaches the students to put forth the various primary things that need to be checked and inspected in order to determine the common illnesses that any person might face irrespective of their age.

The Educator leans in to listen to Asher share his ideas about the story which she has just read to the children.

a.Explain how the Educator in Scenario C is demonstrating respect for Asher’s contribution to the story

The above scenario portrays an educator who has been leaning towards the child in order to listen to the various ideas and outlooks that the concerned child has to share related to the story that the educator had just completed reading out to the class. These approaches by the educator towards the various children helps the students to feel special and attended to. The action of the educator that leads the student to feel included in the classroom and thus tends to open up better in front of the other students. The children tend to feel included within the classroom in the conditions where the educators tend to be attentive to the thoughts and the ideas that the students tend to portray on hearing a story. In this case, the educator is observed to be attentive to the ideas and the thoughts that Asher intends to share in the story that he had just heard from his educator. This action of the educator tends to plant a feeling of inclusiveness in the minds of the concerned child, Asher, in this case.

This picture illustrates the Educator and two children feeding the chickens. The Educator has given each child their own container of pellets. As they scatter the pellets the Educator says, “This is one of my favourite things to do every day. I like it when you help me feed the girls…I wonder if the girls’ are hungry today?” One child says: “I think they might eat it all up” Another responds by saying: “Sometimes they just eat the grass ‘cause they like the grass they do.” This incidental moment captures the Educator and children engaged in a mutually enjoyable, relaxed task.

a.Explain why is it important for the Educator to show enjoyment in the company of the children?

The educator should portray enjoyment in the company of children so that they might learn about all the activities that they might be involved in. The children generally turn to get involved in the various activities that might need the assistance of their elders and their educators. The educators are advised to deal with the children with a smiling face in order to provide them encouragement in the activities that the children have been involved with. The enjoyment of the educators tends to provide for the encouragement to the children. The enjoyment that is observed on the faces of the educators tend to provide the children with a sense of security thus helping to create warm and nurturing relationships with the educator. This helps to maintain and develop the knowledgeability and the confident self-identities of the children. In this case, the educator is seen to be helping the children with their activity of feeding the chicken. The children are seen to be scattering the pellets along with the concerned educator. The concerned educator is seen thanking the children for the help that they have been offering in the activity of feeding the children. This might help in the children to develop warm relations with their educator who tends to impart knowledge about the chickens and their food during this activity. The educator might take this chance to help the students to learn about the type of food grains that must be offered to the chicken. The children tend to learn better from an educator who tends to smile and maintain a jovial atmosphere around them.

The Educator is engaging in one-to-one play with a toddler. The Educator takes on the role of reporter by describing the actions of the child and what happens to the ball when Rory pushes it into one of the holes in the play frame. “Oh Rory you are putting the ball right up the top. I wonder where it will come out? Here it comes? Can you see it? Yes, you caught it, well done Rory.” Rory laughs, looks at the Educator and indicates that he wants to put it in the hole again. “You want to do it again Rory? Do you think you can catch it again? Let’s see.”

a.Explain how the Educator supports Rory as a competent and curious learner?

The educator, in this case, is seen to be involved in a role-play situation with a toddler. The toddler seems to be enjoying the fact that the educator is putting forth a running commentary on the actions that the toddler had been performing. The educator tends to be greatly attentive to the nonverbal areas of the communication that the toddler has been conveying. The actions of the toddler, Rory, is observed to be enjoying the description that the educator has been using to describe the actions of the toddler. The repetition of the act by the toddler indicates that he has been interested in the concerned activity and seems to be learning from the issue. The educator helps him to hone his competence and quench is curiosity by assuming the reporter who is describing the actions of the concerned toddler. This also acts as an encouragement to the concerned child thereby helping him to repeat the action of pushing the ball through one hole and catching it when it emerges from the other side.

15.Quality Area 6 of the National Quality Standards provides educators with guidelines and instruction on how to establish and maintain effective relationships with children and families and how to reflect the culture and practices of their local community.

Read the following Standards and identify what each standard aims to achieve?

National Quality Standard How does the standard support quality education and care?

Standard 6.1 - Respectful, supportive relationships with families are developed and maintained.” The partnerships with the families tend to contribute to the building of a strong and inclusive community within the existence of the service. The continuous and the honest and open exchange with the concerned educators helps the concerned families to feel well-connected to the educational experiences of the children. This also aims to help the parents to gain knowledge of the care that is being administered to their wards and thereby helps the concerned parents to gain an insight in the various services and thus develops the confidence and the trust of the parent on the system that helps their children to develop and grow.

Standard 6.2 - Families are supported in their parenting role and their values and beliefs about child-rearing are respected The factors that influence the family on either the inside or the outside might have an influence on the wellbeing of the children in the family. The collaboration of the educators and the supervisors with the parents in the upbringing of the child tends to help the parents in making decisions for the betterment of the child. This helps to identify the abilities and the strengths of the children and thus helps the parents with the necessary support that they require in matters pertaining to their parenting skills.

Standard 6.3 - The service collaborates with other organisations and service providers to enhance children’s learning and wellbeing The collaboration and the openness among the various educators, the community service providers and the family of the concerned child tends to be more beneficial to the upbringing of the child as well as the academic life of the concerned child. This might also help the concerned educators and the family members to come together and help each other in finding the solutions to the various problems that they might face with respect to the learning capacity of the concerned child.

16.List the five guidelines given in relation to how services provide care and education for children in Regulation 155: Interactions with children.

The five guidelines stated in the “Regulation 155: Interaction with children” that pertain to the ways in ways that are used by the various services in order to provide the children with the needed education and care are enlisted below.

ØThe children should be encouraged to share their opinions and express themselves to the

ØThe children should be allowed to take part in the experiences that might help them to develop the qualities like self-esteem and self-reliance

ØThe providers are advised to maintain the rights and the dignity of each child at any given point of time.

ØThe provider must provide each and every child with the encouragement and the positive guidance that is needed by the child in order to identify and practice acceptable behaviour.

ØThe provider must bear regards towards the abilities, the age, the cultural and the family values, the intellectual and the physical abilities of the child who is being taken care of and educated by the concerned service.

17.What instruction is given in Regulation 156: Relationships in groups?

The “Regulation 156: Relationships in groups” state that the provider of any care and education service who has been approved must take care of the fact that the children have access to the care and the education that they are entitled to have. The provider must also keep a watch out for the fact that the children are provided with the various opportunities to interact with the educators and develop positive and respectful relationships among their peers as well as the volunteers who have been working with them on a regular basis. The provider is also entrusted with the duties to look out for the composition and the size of the groups of students that are being managed by the concerned educators.

18.Children will show signs of distress in different ways and the Educator’s response should be adjusted to suit the needs of individual children. For each of the following examples, suggest an appropriate Educator response.

Emotional Response Appropriate Educator Behaviour

Withdrawal in a preschool age child. The educator is advised to spend more time with the concerned child and try to find out the reason behind the withdrawal. The educator needs to be more attentive to a child who has been withdrawing from the rest of the group. The educator is also advised to report this issue to the family of the concerned child.

Outburst of anger followed by sobbing in a toddler. The educator is advised to display a huge control over his or her emotions. The educator might try to distract the child by helping the child to focus its attention on something else. The educator is advised to keep a watch for the safety of the child and offer the concerned child with some other plaything that might captivate the attention of the concerned child.

An infant crying. The educator is advised to attempt to put the infant to rest by rocking the child to sleep or speaking softly while holding the child close. The educators might also attempt to pacify the child with an activity that might get the child distracted from the reason behind the crying. The educator might also try to pacify the concerned infant by addressing the feelings of the concerned child.

19.Read the following scenarios and for each one describe how you could support the child and respond in a way that acknowledges the child’s skills/abilities whilst, at the same time, promoting or protecting their self-esteem.

Scenario How would you respond?

A group of girls aged between 4 years and 4 years 6 months are sitting at the collage table. They are chatting and happily cutting various items for their creations, all except Tara. Tara is not able to cut as efficiently as the others and is looking ‘downcast’ and beginning to rip her work in frustration. I, as an educator would ask Tara to continue with the cutting of the items. I would also encourage Tara by praising her work and would offer to help her in the cutting of the paper.

When out in the playground, you hear a loud cry from Lily (2 years 2 months) who is sitting on the top of the slippery dip. She has climbed up the steps but, once at the top, is afraid to either slide or climb down. I would reach Lily without wasting time and convince her to come sliding down to the bottom of the slippery dip where I would place myself. In case Lily refuses to budge from her place, I would climb up the steps and slide down the slippery dip along with her in an attempt to erase her fear.

Group Time each day in the pre-school room includes a ‘News Time’ when individual children are asked to come to the front of the group and show or tell their ‘news’. Steven (5 years 4 months) refuses to have his turn when asked though he is happy to talk individually to the educator about his exciting weekend activities. I, as an educator would ask Steven as to why he is not comfortable with the idea of speaking to the entire class. I would try to persuade him to continue with his turn to speak to the class.

20.For each of the statements below identify:

i.What sort of influence the statement would have on children’s developing self-esteem i.e. positive or negative; and

ii.How you could re-word the negative statements to promote self-esteem and self-confidence?

Statement Positive or Negative? Changed responses for negative statements

Don’t do it that way – it’s wrong! Negative Sorry, I think you would be disappointed if you try it your way. Let us give it a try anyways. I know of a better way to do the work. Do you want to try that?

You have done a wonderful job of putting your toys away. Positive

That’s ok, but it would be better done this way. Negative That was a well-done job. I have an easier way to do the job. Do you want to try it?

Why do you always get so dirty? Negative You are a very active child, aren’t you? Come here let us get you cleaned.

You have to try harder to throw the ball straight. Positive

You have been so helpful in the kitchen Thank you. Positive

Mummy will really like your drawing. Positive

What is it? I don’t know what you have drawn. Negative That is a wonderful picture. Could you please tell me more about it?

You look so smart today in your new track suit. Positive

That was really nice to share your train with Billy. Positive

21.List five considerations Educators should make when organising the environment and resources in a manner which will reduce children’s stress and frustration?

The concerned educators might be advised to undertake a few considerations while organising the concerned environment and the resources in such a manner that might help to bring about a reduction in the frustration and the stress levels of a child. The five considerations that the educators generally undertake are enlisted below:

ØThe educators are advised to offer the child with some of the materials that might help to fuel the special interest pf the concerned child

ØThe changes that the educator plans to carry out should be brought about gradually so as to help the child to accommodate to the same. The bringing about of all the changes in one go might lead to the stress and the frustration of the child.

ØThe educators are advised to consider the age group of the concerned children before implementing any changes.

ØThe educators are advised to have a commendable range of the activities for the children to be engaged in on the basis of the abilities and the skills of the child.

ØThe activities that are chosen by the educators should be easy for the concerned child to reach and to pack away after the child is done with the same.

22.List five daily management strategies Educators can use to support pro-social behaviour and help prevent children’s stress and frustration.

The educators are generally advised to follow certain management strategies in order to assist the prevention of the frustration and stress in the children and to support the pro-school behaviours. The five daily management strategies that can be used by the educators are enlisted below.

The educators might allow the children to listen to the music all throughout the day. The music that is chosen by the concerned educator should have a calming effect on the concerned child.

The educators might promote the practice of yoga among the children that might help them to calm down.

The educators might also promote among the children the activity of meditation which is known to have a calming effect on the minds of the children.

The educators are also advised to provide the concerned students with the positive encouragement which would help them to gain the much-needed self-reliance.

The educators are advised to greet the concerned children with a smile on their faces and portray a positivity in the body language that they might use while dealing with the children.

23.Children will remember, and learn from consequences they have actually experienced. In this case there really is no need for Educators to add to the stress or frustration the child is feeling but it is much more constructive and positive to show understanding and support for the child – building a positive, respectful relationship.

Ravi (4 years 6 months) is enjoying kicking the soccer ball around the playground. He then decides to kick it towards the fence, as the goal posts. His first two shots land low down the fence but the third shot only just avoids going over the fence. The Educator says “Oh, wow! That was close wasn’t it, Ravi. You know that if the ball goes over the fence, we can’t get it back again.”

Ravi continues to kick the ball into the fence and, sure enough, it goes over! The educator says “Oh dear. That’s a shame. No more soccer game, eh?”

a.Read the above scenario and comment on whether the Educator’s response was good or not and why?

The response of the educator in this case might not be considered to be good. The response of the educator depicts a huge amount of negativity that should not be depicted in dealing with any child. The educator should not have displayed the use of sarcasm while dealing with the child. The educator should have dealt with the child in a more positive manner. The educator could have warned the child in a more pacified manner which would help the child to understand that there is a chance of the ball going out of the fence which might hamper his play.

Sienna (3 years 8 months) has brought a new plastic ring, which she got at a friend’s birthday party yesterday, to the centre today. When it is time for outdoor play, the Educator suggests to Sienna that she should put her ring in her locker as it might get lost outside or in the sandpit. Sienna says “No. I won’t lose it. I’ll be careful.” So the educator allows her to leave the ring on.

After approximately half an hour, the Educator hears crying and franticly searching in the sandpit – the ring has disappeared! The Educator says “Oh no. I’ll help you look for it, Sienna, but it will be very hard to find, won’t it?”

a.Read the above scenario and comment on whether the Educator’s response was good or not and why?

The response of the educator was good. There was a tone of understanding and assurance that was used by the educator which helped in pacifying the child to some extent.

Zara (4 years 2 months has come to pre-school today with no hat. When they arrived this morning, Zara’s mother explained that she asked her to go get her hat before they left home but she refused, so, her mother said, she would have to stay inside today. When it was outdoor play time, the Educator offered Zara a spare hat that they had at the centre so she would be able to play outside. Zara didn’t like to look of the spare hat so the Educator said “Well you have the choice, Zara. You can wear this hat and play out in the yard or you can choose to sit on the veranda.” Zara chose the veranda.  

After five minutes, Zara said she wanted to play in the yard. The Educator gave her the same choice. Zara still refused to wear the hat so had to stay on the veranda, no matter how much she protested!

a.Read the above scenario and comment on whether the Educator’s response was good or not and why?

The response of the educator was well presented in this scenario. The actions of the educator had made it clear to the concerned child, Zara, that she had to abide by the rules that was set by the authorities of the pre-school.

24.Read each statement and:

i.Suggest the most appropriate Educator response (you may choose more than one) from the list below.

ii.Give a reason for your choice of strategy – you should draw on your knowledge of child development.

Ignore Ask questions Take action alongside Natural consequences

Role model Brainstorm Praise desired behaviour Logical consequences

Act as reporter Offer ideas Distract/substitute Conflict resolution

Step in/set limits Offer a choice Redirect Change environment

Statement Appropriate Educator Response Reason for choice of strategy

Liam (4 years) and Zac (5 years 1 month) have been building an elaborate castle in the block corner. They have worked on their creation for at least an hour. As he is reaching for a block, Liam accidently knocks over part of the building. Zac screams at Liam, “You idiot, now look what you’ve done!” Offer ideas, conflict resolution, step in/ set limits. The conflict that has arisen among the children needs to be solved with the intervention of an educator. the educator might help the students by providing them with similar ideas and reprimanding Zac for his outburst that might have hurt Liam

Binnie a toddler is playing with a doll, Cara (2 years 4 months) grabs the doll saying “That mine”, Binnie starts to cry

Ask questions, offer a choice, change environment

The educator should primarily ask questions to Cara for claiming the doll. The educator should then turn to the toddler and offer her a change in the environment along with a choice of another play item.

Molly (3 years 7 months) finds it hard to make friends. Today she walks into the dramatic play area saying “I want to play too!” Molly then snatches a doll from the high chair saying “I’m the mother.” The children begin to argue and tell Molly to go away. Molly stomps off saying, “I hate you!”

The educator should step into the situation and offer the children with ideas that might help them to resolve the matter. The educator might also take action so as to help the children to return to the normal environment.

Carrie (3 years) has been asked twice by the Educator not to throw sand. On this occasion the Educator says “Carrie I have reminded you not to throw sand. You need to leave the sand pit and go find something else to do.” Carrie yells at the Educator “I hate you.”

Ask questions, change environment

The educator should inquire on the matter that had been troubling the child and if needed change the environment of the child

Mia (4 years 9 months) Mia is sitting at the puzzle table attempting a difficult puzzle. In frustration Mia says, “This bloody puzzle is too hard.”

The educator should be advised to brainstorm Mia about the use of the language and also offer the help that she needs for solving the puzzle.

Preschoolers Kurt, Jovana, Seren and Emmanuel are playing on the bikes; they are pretending to be police officers. The game continues for around 20 minutes and then starts to get out of hand. The children are not following the bike ‘rules’ and are beginning to annoy other children.

Step in/set limits, take action alongside The educator is advised to step in and reprimand the preschoolers for not following the rules that have been set by the educator. the educator should also take actions to implement the order that should be maintained.

Preschoolers Serena, Asiah and Zenna have been playing in the garden with jungle animals, small dolls and pieces of fabric. The children have created a little village. Asiah had the idea of creating a river. She dug a hole and poured water into it. Unfortunately the water spilled over and flooded the village. Now Serena and Zanna are upset with Asiah. Natural consequences. Change environment The educator should intervene among the children in order to help them resolve the conflict that arose among them

When Pedra (18 months) is playing outside in the toddler area he gets upset and begins to cry if he sees his older sister in the preschool play area.

Change environment

The educator should attempt to change the environment where the toddlers are being allowed to play and thus check whether the child reacts in a similar manner.

25.Name the Quality Area that relates to children’s behaviour from the NQS?

The Quality Area 5 of the National Quality Standard deals with the behaviours of the children and their outcomes.

26.In reference to the EYLF name the Learning Outcome and Indicator that relates to Children’s behaviour?

The learning outcome and indicator that is related to the behaviour of the children according to the EYLF is enlisted below.

2.1 The children develop a sense of belonging to the groups and communities and an understanding of the reciprocal rights and responsibilities necessary for the active community participation (Acecqa.gov.au., 2018).

Start recognizing the fact that they do hold the right s to belong to a number of the communities

Cooperate with the others and take part in the negotiation of the roles and the relationships in the episodes of playing and other group experiences

Take action that might seem helpful to the other children who have been participating in the various social groups.

Broaden the understanding that they have of the world wherein they do live

Make an attempt to express their opinions in the matters that might affect them.

Take a cue from the social experiences that they have been going through so that they might explore the other ways of being

Demonstrate participation in the reciprocal relationships

Depict gradual improvement in following the behaviour of the other in their vicinity and tend to respond to them.

Depict the understanding of the various ways of contribution through the activities like playing and other similar projects.

Depict a sense of belonging and the comfort in their environments.

Depict playfulness and tend to give positive responses to the others by reaching out to them for the needed friendship and company.

Educators need to be careful not to ‘reward’ inappropriate behaviour. Sometimes, our responses to a behaviour do, in fact, allow the child to achieve their goal, which may be to avoid something or to get extra attention. Read the following scenarios and use the table below to document your responses to the following questions:

i.Is the Educator strategy effective or ineffective?

ii.Is it rewarding the child’s inappropriate child’s behaviour?

iii.Give a reason for your answer.

Scenarios Effective or Ineffective? Reason for your Response

Leo (3 years) packed away all the sand toys outside and helped put the cover on the sandpit. When he came inside, Jenni, his Educator, thanked him for helping and asked him if he would like to choose the story for story time.  Effective Strategy

The strategy taken up by the educator is effective since it promotes the rewarding of the child who has displayed a correct behavior.

Every time Yohan (18 months) attempted to bite another child the Educators scolded him and told him not to bite the other children. He was removed from the activity he was playing with, and sat on one of the Educator's knee for five minutes and talked to about how he must not bite his friends.  Effective Strategy

The educator, in this case, has been dealing with a child who has been attempting to bite the other children who have been playing with him on the same activity. The educator here is observed to hold his or her patience and make an attempt to put across to Yohan on the consequences of biting his playmate.

Nikita (3 years 5 months) held the door open as the children came inside. As the last child came through the door Naomi, her Educator, smiled and thanked her. The Educator then asked her where she would like to sit.  Effective Strategy

The strategy adopted by the educator here helps to reinforce the fact that the child had been doing the correct thing and that she should be rewarded for the same.

Maya (3 years) had become very finicky about her food. Whenever she refused to eat what was offered to her she was immediately given a Vegemite sandwich.  Effective Strategy

The case that has been shared here tends to depict the fact that the educator might have been awarding a behavior that was not so proper on the part of the child.

At story time Anna (4 years) pinched the child sitting next to her. The child let out a huge wail and Steve, her Educator, told her firmly that as she was hurting and disturbing the other children she wouldn't be able to stay and listen to the story. He told her to go with Nessa, the other Educator. Nessa took Anna into the kitchen to get the cutlery and to lay the table for lunch.  Effective Strategy

The educator, in this case, is found to take the proper action against the behavior that had been taken up by the concerned child.

28.Read the scenarios and answer the related questions.

Thomas (22 months) has been playing with some farm animals and blocks on the veranda. He decides to relocate to the garden and attempts to carry all of the animals and blocks at the same time. His attempts to pick up and hold on to all of these materials fails, he keeps dropping things and becoming increasingly frustrated.

Kael (18 months) picks up the horse dropped by Thomas and begins to walk away with it in his hand. Thomas throws down the materials he is holding and begins to scream. He then drops to the ground sobbing and kicking his legs.

a.How could the Educator in the Scenario ‘Thomas’ respond to help the children manage their emotions?

In the given scenario, the educator might have intervened and asked both the children to take part in playing with the farm animals and the blocks together. This would have helped the students to develop a friendship amongst them. The picking up of the horse by Karl and his walking away triggers a sense of frustration in Thomas who is then observed to throw down all the things that he had been holding and start crying.

Arik (4 years 2 months) is having an upset day. He has just pushed Zac off the walking beam and is screaming that he is an “idiot”. Zac responds by saying to Arik that he is a “dumb head baby”.

The Educator, Brian, approaches Arik to ask what is happening. Brian puts his hand on Arik’s shoulder to calm him, but Arik jerks away and runs crying to the bathroom. Brian follows Arik and tries to talk to him.

Brian: “I can see you’re really angry and upset, Arik can we talk about it?”

Arik: “No, I hate you and I hate dumb Zac”

Arik then starts to pull paper from the towel dispenser and throw it around the bathroom.

a.Read the scenario and suggest how the Educator should respond to help the children manage their emotions?

The educator should try to pacify the child and make an attempt to figure out the reason behind the sudden change in the nature and the activities of the child. The educator should make it a point so as not to upset the child in the process of enquiry.

29.The strategies listed below are some of the ways we can guide children’s behaviour positively. For each strategy briefly explain, in your own words, what each one means.

Strategy Description

Modelling behaviours. The educator is advised to present the children with the model behaviour that they expect the child to put forth.

Use words and actions. The educator should help the child to understand the expected type of behaviour through the appropriate use of the language.

Explain. The educator is advised to explain to the child the incorrectness in the behaviour if he or she is involved in some unacceptable behaviour.

Be firm when you need to be. The educator is further advised to show firmness and strictness at times in order to instil in the child the expected behaviour and the quality to respect the feelings of the others.

Give choices and empower children appropriately. The educator must provide the children with the choices so as to help the child to learn about the importance of a certain person or activity in the given situation.

Avoid encouraging ‘hollow’ gestures. The educator is advised not to promote any hollow gestures. The children must be monitored so that they might deliver the most concrete gestures that might convey their needs in a proper manner.

Try to avoid power struggles. The educator should look into the matter that the children are comfortable to come up to the concerned educator regarding any problem that they might be facing. The power struggles between the children and the concerned educators should be discouraged.

Acknowledge desirable behaviour. The positive acknowledgement from the educator tends to help the children to build the required self-esteem and provides them with the encouragement to continue with the concerned behaviour.

30.Read the Scenario and answer the related questions.

Well. It’s not me!

It is mid-October and the 4 – 5 year old group at Blue Bay Childcare Centre are all moving on to ‘big school’ next year. Recently, the educators have struggled with a rise in the amount of unacceptable and very challenging behaviours. The issue is raised at a staff meeting and several suggestions are made about how the children’s behaviour could be managed and what should be the consequences for unacceptable behaviour. Then, it is suggested that the children be consulted and involved in the process. Lisa, the Room Leader, is excited by this idea and decides to implement it straight away!

The next day, Lisa introduces a discussion with the children at Group Time. She begins by saying “You know, lately there has been lots of behaviour that is against our rules. We have seen children hurting each other and making other children get upset.” Several of the children call out things like “Yeah. Well it’s not me!” or “Max is the one who does it all!”

Lisa says “Well, Sophie (the other educator in the room) and I have decided that we are going to ask for your help to fix the problem. Do you think you can do that?” The children agree so Lisa moves on. “Good. The first thing we need to decide is what behaviour is not allowed here. You tell me what you think and I’ll write it on this big piece of paper I have here. Then we’ll have a list of ‘rules’, ok?”

References

Acecqa.gov.au. 2018. "Quality Area 5 - Relationships With Children". Acecqa.Gov.Au. https://www.acecqa.gov.au/nqf/national-quality-standard/quality-area-5-relationships-with-children.

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