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Discuss the impact of promotion on constumers brand loyalty of MacDonald's branch of Dalston-Hacney in London?

It is essential to build the best possible practice of inclusive education through the engagement of discourse between the different perspectives (Monsen et al., 2011). In the context of this paper, it is understood that inclusive childhood education for disable children stems from belief system and that underpins attitudes and practices in inclusive education. When every child with certain disabilities cannot be distinguished from other children in the school community and will get same educational environment that time one can say inclusive education is achieved (Tarleton & Ward, 2007).  Our position will state to educate the children with certain disabilities in the mainstream education system regardless of their disabilities.

The method used by ACT presently for assessment should require Centered Appraisal of Students Need and the criteria used for judgment is dependent on how students fit into the current school environment. Students have to overcome the barriers to attend the chosen school such as to adjust into the schools physical environment or the preconceived notion which requires that the student will be unable to cope within an inclusive setting (Bunch and  Valeo, 2004). But actually it is the school’s responsibility to assess and ensure that their physical setting and underlying values and principles should set in a way that ensure students would receive a safe and valuable education. Discussions would be based on the ACT Department of Education and Training’s value of inclusivity and their commitment towards an education system which identifies different needs of each student (ACT Department of Education and Training, 2006).

This position is taken because we strongly feel that children having certain disability should get same right as other children and also get additional rights because of their disability.  It is their right to be valued as individuals and considered as contributing person of family, communities and society. It is intended to create a vision for high inclusive education practice in early childhood education and care (ECEC). The position aims to assist ECEC professionals and all support people to include children with disability and acquire high output from them.

It is understood by the advocacy for inclusion that children with disability should have the right to get inclusive education of their choice similar to the students in the broader community (Lamont & Bromfield, 2009, pp.15).  Our focus is to get support from the ACT Department of Education and Australian Government and also from the community for the children with disabilities and who could not make or realize their choice and hence encourage them to participate meaningfully in their chosen school community. The school communities should be ready for inclusion of all children, and they have to recognize that though children having certain disabilities but they can contribute uniquely to community life (Cologon, 2012, p. 1158).

The important aspect of inclusive education is that they can support and strengthen personal relationship of disable children with the social networks.  Each child should get individual and flexible support to accomplish their particular needs (Cologon, 2013a, p. 155). Main hurdles in providing successful inclusion of children in a mainstream setting is process used to fulfill student’s individual needs, assessed the requirement and people attitudes towards change at school, system and community level (Early Childhood Australia (ECA),2006)

Rationale

Vygotsky (1978) states that child culture development functions appear twice. First is during social interaction and second is interacting with individuals and named then as inter-psychology and intra-psychology respectively. According to Cologon, (2013b) inclusion is related to the segregation or integration on a number of levels for example part time integration with the schools.  Through this system the students with disabilities have been benefited in academic and social means and would get full inclusive education environments.  Australia’s first National Quality Framework (NQF) (DEEWR, 2012) on inclusion and educational arrangement it conclude that, this education arrangements have tremendous effect on formation of friendship, abusive behaviors prevalence and advocacy frequency of children having disabilities with their peers (Monsen et. al., 2011, pp. 494). The study also found that students studying in inclusive schools have friends who have certain disabilities, weather students come from special education school structure do not have such a friend (Cologon, 2013b, p. 118). The result of this is that the student getting education in inclusive environment has special education results towards positive social relationship as compared to the special education school students (ACT Department of Education and Training, 2012). Students do not create these differences, even they do not know such differences but their education system and peers characterize their education from the children having disabilities (D’Alessio & Watkins, 2009, p. 236). It is shown through the evidence that the children’s learn in their early age from the experiences of relationships and interactions have influence on their early brain development and will also be result in their future life outcomes (Centre on the Developing Child at Harvard University, 2011; National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, 2004, 2007; Shonkoff & Phillips, 2000)

Students who do not have disabilities and who have experience in studying under inclusiveness and inclusion environment have positive effects such as:

1. Reduced fear of human differences and can interact with them with total comfort and awareness (Early Childhood Australia, 2006).

2. Their social cognition like tolerance would increase (Early Childhood Australia, 2006).

3. Their self concept has improved (Early Childhood Australia, 2006).

4. Would experience enhancement in their personal principle such as they feel responsibility towards fulfilling needs of others (Early Childhood Australia, 2006).

5. Would experience meaning of warm and caring friendship (Early Childhood Australia, 2006).

The negative aspects of inclusion have been discarded in many studies. For example if children who have several disabilities would include in mainstream class, it would not create much effect on allocated and engaged time of teacher which they have got to teach other students (de Graaf, 2013, p. 25). Main hurdles in providing successful inclusion of children in a mainstream setting is process used to fulfill student’s individual needs, assessed the requirement and people attitudes towards change. Finally it is also proved through the studies that students having certain disabilities do better in academics as well as they do better socially when they got educated from the system of inclusive setting rather than getting education from special schools (Peetsma et.al., 2001). These studies shows good evidence which demonstrates importance of inclusive education and their benefits students with or without disabilities receive.

Background

The goal of this discussion is prove importance of inclusive education and get support from ACT Department of Education, from Australian Government and also from the community for the children with disabilities.

The program includes:

1. Educating the children who have certain disabilities in the mainstream education system regardless of their disabilities (Graham & Spandagou, 2011, p. 237).To provide the opportunities in front of all students to learn from each other’s contributions such as professionals and leaders working in this sector need to work towards building positive attitudes, belief and values about the inclusive education in communities. There should be the facility through which the families having children with certain disabilities can get accurate and comprehensive information about disabilities and another services related to this context.

2. It is recommended that accountability systems in Australia and its state should be introduced. Those systems will monitor to increase the number of children with disability can get enrolled in inclusive programs, should get improvement in inclusive practices quality (Gable, 2013, p12). Another point the systems have to focus on outcome of the children having disability in the setting of ECEC program.

3. Required stable and skilled professionals in ECEC settings. The professional should have relevant knowledge, skills and access to ongoing professional development and support.

Mainstream classes and schools get necessary services and preferably within regular classrooms. Ready to give support to the teachers and administrators working in mainstream schools for example provide time, training, teamwork and resources to them.

The children who have disabilities would include in academic classes appropriate with their age and should be included in all the activities conducted by schools like music, arts, physical education and assemblies and so on.  It is possible when all ECEC team members will strengthen their contribution; they have to focus particularly on encouraging child to contribute to their own and others’ learning. Family member can play essential role in their child’s learning and also be a good decision maker in their child’s education and care (Centre on the Developing Child at Harvard University, 2011). 

It is required to work with ACT Department of education and ACT Government in order to endure about the departmental policies and actions. Also it is essential to promote inclusive education which includes participation of ACT Special Education Groups.   Inclusion should incorporate all the factors of students’ school life and also encourage their participation in outside school areas (Gore, 2010, p.34 ).

Conclusion:

It is believed by the advocacy for inclusion that all students can get inclusive education, only need is to get appropriate support to ensure all students should get education of their choice (Starke, 2010, pp. 15). The important aspect of inclusive education is that they can support and strengthen personal relationship of disable children with the social networks.  Each child should get individual and flexible support to accomplish their particular needs. Main hurdles in providing successful inclusion of children in a mainstream setting is process used to fulfill student’s individual needs, assessed the requirement and people attitudes towards change at school, system and community level.  In ACT inclusive education should have been promoted exclusively and also needed encouragement and participation of public forums and spreading awareness and informing the education options for students having disabilities.

Recommendations

Reference List:

ACT Department of Education and Training, School Policy - Services To Students With Disabilities Policy and Mandatory Procedures, March 2012

ACT Department of Education and Training, Strategic Plan 2006-2009, May 2006, 4 3

Centre on the Developing Child at Harvard University (2011). Building the brain’s ‘air traffic control’ system: How early experiences shape the development of executive function: Working Paper No. 11. Available at www.developingchild.harvard.edu

Cologon, K. (2012). Confi dence in their own ability: Postgraduate early childhood students examining their attitudes towards inclusive education. International Journal of Inclusive Education, 16(11), 1155–1173.

Cologon, K. (2013a). Recognising our shared humanity: human rights and inclusive education in Italy and Australia. Italian Journal of Disability Studies, 1(1). 151-169.

Cologon, K. (2013b). Growing up with ‘difference’: Inclusive education and the portrayal of characters who experience disability in children’s literature. Write4Children: The International Journal for the Practice and Theories of Writing for Children and Children’s Literature, 4(2), 100–120.

D’Alessio, S., & Watkins, A. (2009). International comparisons of inclusive policy and practice: Are we talking about the same thing? Research in Comparative and International Education Journal, 4(3), 233–49.

de Graaf, G., Van Hove, G., & Haveman, M. (2013). More academics in regular schools? The effect of regular versus special school placement on academic skills in Dutch primary school students with Down syndrome. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 57(1), 21–38.

Early Childhood Australia (ECA) (2006). Code of Ethics. Available at ttps://www.earlychildhoodaustralia.org.au/  code_of_ethics/early_childhood_australias_code_of_ ethics.html.

Graham, L. J., & Spandagou, I. (2011). From vision to reality: views of primary school principals on inclusive education in New South Wales, Australia. . Disability and Society, 26(2), 223–237.

Gable, A., S. (2013). Disability theorising and real-world educational practice: a framework for understanding. Disability & Society, 1–15.

Gore, N., 2010, Building effective support for learning disabled parents, Community Care, (1844), 34-35.

Lamont, A., & Bromfield, L. (2009). Parental intellectual disability and child protection: Key issues. National Child Protection Clearing House, (31), 1-18.

Monsen, K., Sanders, A., Yu, F., Radosevich, D., & Geppert, J, 2011, Family home visiting outcomes for mothers with and without intellectual disabilities, Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 55(5), 484-499

McConnell, D. & Llewellyn, G, 2002, Stereotypes, Parents with Intellectual Disability and Child Protection, Journal of Social Welfare and Family Law, 24 (3), 297 - 317

Mildon, R., Matthews, J., & Gavidia-Payne, S. (2003). Understanding and supporting parents with learning difficulties. Melbourne: Victorian Parenting Centre

McConnell, D., Llewellyn, G., & Ferronato, L. (2000). Parents with a disability and the NSW Children's Court. Sydney: University of Sydney

Starke, M., 2010, Encounters with professionals: views and experiences of mothers with intellectual disability, Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, 14(1), 9-19.

Shonkoff J. P., & Phillips, D. A. (Eds) (2000). From neurons to neighborhoods: The science of early childhood development. Committee on Integrating the Science of Early Childhood Development, Board on Children, Youth, and Families. Available from the National Academies Press at https://www.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=9824.

Tarleton, B., & Ward, L., 2007, “Parenting with support”: The views and experiences of parents with intellectual disabilities. Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities, 4(3), 194-202.

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My Assignment Help. (2016). Impact Of Promotion On Customer Brand Loyalty Of McDonald's Branch In Dalston-Hackney, London. Retrieved from https://myassignmenthelp.com/free-samples/macdonalds-branch-of-dalston-hacney-in-london.

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