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Discuss about the THT2114 Representations of Aboriginality in Tourism.

Protecting and preserving the Tjukurpa landscape

Most of the ecosystem and conservation programs try to complement the inclusiveness, sufficiency and illustrative-ness of the public reserve system by addressing to safeguard the ecosystems on the private land. None of the parks exists in separation, and the facts about the park are quite clear since the areas around the parks are usually developed for an existing space, farming, forestry and more activities (Wearing & Wearing, 2016). Moreover, the traditional and iconic kinds persevered inside the parks needs to be maintained to include the lands out of the parks since several species may not survive within them. For instances, from the case study, it has been found that Anagu members made several hard-working efforts for the employment planning by taking into account social as well as religions constraint by allowing the employees with flexible working hours was a difficult task (Seiver & Matthews, 2016).

While doing so, Anagu members had to go away for the park for several days for preparing the religious ceremonies and family duties. As stated by Lima & Weiler (2015), the parks also had to be closed for ritualistic occasions for reducing the disruptions of the tourists. In this context, often the instructions that park employees received influenced the working activities of Anagu members such escaping relationship, where employees were not allowed to communicate with each other, appropriate work for men and women, and prioritising aged people over youngsters decision making. These activities were needed to be taken in to note while developing the working operations.

As stated by Hill & Gale (2016), the term national park consists of big thoughts, natural landscapes that aim to protect the historic cultural resources in Australia. Most of the national parks lack sufficient money and employees to utilise these resources entirely. From the case study, it has been found that Anagu members live and sustainably managed the landscape of Tjukurpa for long period. In this context, preservation of the rocks is the crucial aspect of the management that is a challenging task for the national parks (Ruhanen, Whitford & McLennan, 2015). Anagu members believed that the brand image could be preserved by the providing the visitors with information about the working ways of the traditional owners based on the use of resources and historical evidence about the use of the resource.

The brand image of the national park is another necessary part, such as restriction within the national parks may influence the visitor experience. Moreover, visitors may face overcrowding issues, which are required to balance by the managers by marinating strict laws and rules. According to Kato (2015), maintaining preferences and park utilisation struggles may be growing challenges for the administrator of the national park. In this regards, for Anagu members the important part of preserving the law was by ensuring that not all the knowledge were transferred to wrong people and to ensure that the sacred sites are not accessed by wrong people. In order to manage the brand image, there was a commercial operation such as tour operators and tour guides to help the visitors, profitmaking films and shooting provisions, railing around specific areas of Uluru to make sure that the visitors did not enter the obligated areas (Wilson et al., 2018).

Maintaining the brand image of the national park

Ecosystems and national parks services are falling down specifically when their value is properly appreciated for the first time. The natural ecosystems within restricted areas offer security on food, clean water supplies, disaster mitigation and wealth of effective cultural and spiritual services.  However, Plastina (2018) states that in order to successfully maintain the relationship between profits, people and the ecosystem consumer’s viewpoint about protected areas such as national parks and ecosystems needs to change. From the case study, it is evident that the cultural centre has highly expanded the opportunities for the tourist to learn Anagu members. According to Higgins-Desbiolles (2018), the parks had a huge number of commercial functions in the park that requires a permit. The permitting systems helped to ensure the maintenance of the standards and the accreditation. All the commercial operations including tour operators, provisions for the tourists, the quality of information provided to the tourist helped to increase the profit and value of the national parks. Moreover, the national park invested a lot of money in educating and engaging people in the corporate activities by ensuring the compliance with the relevant laws and by ensuring that all the activities are undertaken in accordance to the necessary obligation (Moorcroft, 2016).

All the provision provided in the national parks included tour guides training and progression liaison with the tourism industry ensured the standards of the national park. The Tsukuba law enhanced the culture and value of the park by offering a medium for most of the interpretations of the park to the tourists. As stated by Carson & Carson, (2016), all the information provided contained various features about the landscape of the region, the ecological value, the species plants and animals and suitable use of the locations within the park. The administrator of the park has passed down the generation of value by sharing it with the visitors. In addition to this, it was a huge part for Anagu members to take care of the religions responsibly to maintain the values of the religions for their sacred confines and remnants (Lyver, Davies & Allen, 2014). In this context, none of the knowledge and access to the sacred sites was allowed the under the law of Anagu members to maintain the sacred sites. Special management measures have been taken to assist Anagu members by continuing safeguarding Tjukurpa by allowing the visitors to enjoy the park.


In order to maintain profit, value, and the ecosystems of the landscape, Anagu members maintained the structured relationships to manage the intricate economic, social and religious accountabilities. According to Grant & Greenop (2018), one of the major benefits of such social set up is that it helped to assist the comparative strategies for movement over the land and for managing the land’s resources. In this context, caring for the land and looking for the country was the most important part of maintaining the conventional law as found from the case study. Anagu members’ knowledge has supported with the location for the developments of the park by identifying the annual and plant by interpreting the landscape features for the tourists.

Challenges of managing tourism

At Uluru Kata Tjuta National park and its complicated negotiations takes place in presenting an interpreting the cultural ecosystem for the visitors. The joint management philosophy of the park defined a different culture that signified interpretive ensures of the regular dialogue in between Anagu members, the traditional administrator of the park and in between the management of the park. Each year several people returned to the sorry rocks to return the rocks. However, for Anagu members and the employees of the park, the management of the sorry rock has turned in to a major issue of management and interpretive difficulty (Abascal, Fluker & Jiang, 2016). In this context, according to my perception, the sorry rock in a factor if an interpretive aspect that crosses through multiple cultures and mediums for interoperations'. In order to manage the sorry rocks and resources, the park has been consistently working with the different researcher in consultation with many undertaken by the Anagu members.

These activities helped in developing approaches for maintaining and interpreting the sorry rocks. Several places in the park containing sorry risks are places of enormous spiritual and cultural importance to Anagu members that turned in to major symbols of Australia. According to my opinion, sorry rocks has a spiritual and cultural symbol that required effective knowledge culture and science as well as experience and various process if governance to protect the goodwill of the park. However, I think that all the landscapes of Uluru including sorry rocks will remain an important place for learning and knowledge since all the humans and plants and resources contain necessary information about life and living. This is because from my research I have learned that there is deep-seated predictability about the spirituality and culture of Aboriginals. I have found that a huge number of Australian admits that, there is a huge number of returns, which has remained steady after the government apologised for the stolen generations (Holder & Ruhanen, 2017). Anagu Members has always remained focused on motivating people and not to take the rocks from Uluru in the first place. From my personal point of view, it can be said that story about sorry rocks may be a threat to the micro pathogens and to the strict laws related to the Australian culture.

On the contrary, it can also be said that people or tourists tend to souvenir various objects from cultural and heritage areas from all over the world. However, tourists are also returning the objects to the natural and cultural sites due to its spiritual significance, this is because some of the people later return those rocks out of respect for the couture and maybe they thought that it was a bad luck. Therefore, it can be said that sorry rocks had transformed the Uluru Park into some other culture that not only managed to sustain the natural resources but also sustained the respect and integrity if the cultural belief associated with the landscape resources.

Interpreting the cultural ecosystem for visitors


In order to manage the sustainability, it is needed to maintain the aspects of environment, culture, and society according to the needs of the consumers and the business objectives. The Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park is extremely significant in terms of its cultural landscape. In my opinion, this is why the management has decided to include the people of Anangu and Piranapa culture in the management to produce a culturally sustainable ambience. Together, the people of both cultures would be able to employ the traditional laws and apply the non-indigenous knowledge that is relevant. I believe that the religious, philosophical, and behavioural principles of the Anangu allow living with each other as well as with the nature harmoniously.

As per my observation, the traditional law of these cultures emphasises on the factors such as respect and trust among the people who are responsible for the maintenance of the lands and makes them learn and work together as equals. Anangu gives importance on the act of listening and understanding the mind of the visitors of the land, making the practice sustainable in terms of consumer care (Spenceley et al., 2015). The sustainable management plans of the Tjukurpa includes considering the future, keeping both the visitors and Anangu safe, teaching the visitors and the staffs on observing Tjukurpa, keeping the community private as well as safe, and ensure that the Tjukurpa is observed. According to my perception, looking after the country or taking care of the land is an essential element in the laws of Tjukurpa. I further believe that the knowledge that the people of Anangu have helped in identifying various animals and plants, and making the visitors understand the features of the landscape.


As I have noticed, the people of Anangu refer themselves as one people, which indicate that their relationships have a detailed structure of social, economic and religious rights as well as responbilities. In my opinion, the greatest advantage of this system is that it initiates cooperative strategies, which leads to responsible consumption of the resources of the land.

The management has focused on the commercial operations in the park by setting a rule of getting a permit at first. This permit is only given if the operators meet the required conditions regarding the access, insurance, fee payment, provision of visitor statistics, and the information that the visitors are provided in order to ensure their responsibilities towards the visitor.

Managing the sorry rock and resources

As per my observation, the management emphasises on educating the people dealing with the commercial activities, making it sure that these activities comply with the laws of the park, and ensuring that the permit is taken before the conduction of any activity. It is the believe of Anangu that informing the visitors about how the owners of the park utilises the resources would enhance their ability of understating the concept of responsible consumption.

Reference list

Abascal, T. E., Fluker, M., & Jiang, M. (2016). Domestic demand for Indigenous tourism in Australia: understanding intention to participate. Journal of Sustainable Tourism, 24(8-9), 1350-1368.

Carson, D. A., & Carson, D. B. (2016). Path dependence in remote area tourism development: Why institutional legacies matter. In Tourism destination evolution (pp. 115-134). Routledge.

Grant, E., & Greenop, K. (2018). Affirming and reaffirming Indigenous presence: Contemporary Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community, public and institutional architecture in Australia. In The handbook of contemporary Indigenous architecture (pp. 57-105). Springer, Singapore.

Higgins-Desbiolles, F. (2018). Event tourism and event imposition: A critical case study from Kangaroo Island, South Australia. Tourism Management, 64, 73-86.

Hill, J., & Gale, T. (2016). Ecotourism and environmental sustainability: An introduction. In Ecotourism and Environmental Sustainability (pp. 21-34). Routledge.

Holder, A., & Ruhanen, L. (2017). Identifying the relative importance of culture in Indigenous tourism experiences: netnographic evidence from Australia. Tourism Recreation Research, 42(3), 316-326.

Kato, K. (2015). Australia's whaling discourse: global norm, green consciousness and identity. Journal of Australian Studies, 39(4), 477-493.

Lima, I., & Weiler, B. (2015). Indigenous protagonism in tourism operations and management in Australia, Brazil, and New Zealand. ASR CMU J Soc Sci Humanities, 2(1), 7-37.

Lyver, P. O. B., Davies, J., & Allen, R. B. (2014). Settling indigenous claims to protected areas: weighing M?ori aspirations against Australian experiences. Conservation and Society, 12(1), 89-106.

Moorcroft, H. (2016). Paradigms, paradoxes and a propitious niche: conservation and Indigenous social justice policy in Australia. Local Environment, 21(5), 591-614.

Plastina, A. F. (2018). The use of markers in web-based tourism discourses of World Heritage: A multimodal discourse analysis. Scripta Manent, 12(1), 86-110.

Ruhanen, L., Whitford, M., & McLennan, C. L. (2015). Indigenous tourism in Australia: Time for a reality check. Tourism Management, 48, 73-83.

Seiver, B., & Matthews, A. (2016). Beyond whiteness: a comparative analysis of representations of Aboriginality in tourism destination images in New South Wales, Australia. Journal of Sustainable Tourism, 24(8-9), 1298-1314.

Spenceley, A., Kohl, J., McArthur, S., Myles, P., Notarianni, M., Paleczny, D., ... & Worboys, G. L. (2015). Visitor management. Protected Area Governance and Management, 715-750.

Wearing, S. L., & Wearing, M. (2016). Decommodifying Grassroots Struggle Against a Neoliberal Tourism Agenda: Imagining a Local, Just and Sustainable Ecotourism. Neoliberalism and the Political Economy of Tourism, 139.

Wilson, E., Nielsen, N., Scherrer, P., Caldicott, R. W., Moyle, B., & Weiler, B. (2018). To climb or not to climb? Balancing stakeholder priorities at an iconic national park. Journal of Ecotourism, 17(2), 140-159.

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