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Overview of the Singapore's Adult Education system

The evaluation report is about Singapore's Adult Education system which is also known as Continuing Education and Training (CET). Singapore is making investments on CET and expanding the "Singapore Workforce Skills Qualifications (WSQ) system" for meeting the growing skills requirements for the educational sector (Ssg.gov.sg, 2015). Training and Adult Education (TAE) framework is developed for improving capabilities along with professionalism of the TAE experts in areas such as adult education, development of human resources, and training management in addition to the development of workforce (Garrett 2015). It meets with demand for education, training along with development into Singapore. The rationale for evaluating Singapore's Adult Education system is required to identify the strategic reasons behind the establishment of CET system and features of the system. The evaluation helps to identify operational linkage between economic strategies of Singapore and skills support required by CET system. Fitzsimons (2015) stated that education system for Singapore builds block for economic as well as national developments. The study analyzes Singapore's Adult Education system to aim at excellence for the student and offer of different choices for the education. Tarrow (2014) argued that Singapore offers of various educations to different types of age groups from the primary to college students. This system provides path lead to a university degree in addition to the job.

This report provides an overview of the Singapore's Adult Education system which is benefited for the adults and children. Aims, objectives and evaluation questions are identified to research a selected topic. Methods are identified to conduct work into the research study. The report examines the strategic direction towards CET into Singapore further national skills from the publicly available information in addition to training as well as development into Singapore.

Singapore's Adult Education system provides various choices of the education for the adults of Singapore. The individuals are searched for better working life balance, demand for flexible work career, therefore it challenges the employment mode. Therefore, there is a requirement to increase the training needs in various skill sets to cope with demand across the educational business sector.

Following are the key evaluation questions behind the development of the Singaporean CET system:

  1. How do Singapore's Adult Education systems enhance literacy and numeracy among people of Singapore?
  2. Is training fatigue a significant challenge for CET in Singapore among the young generations?

  This report aims to provide the effectiveness of the Singapore adult education system that can influence the organizational results. It identifies if the educational system increases literacy among Singaporean. Singapore has kept evolving with the education system such that people of Singapore should rapidly change their economy. The system aims to help the students discover talents and develop passion towards learning. The system also enables employers to learn through education, training along with career guidance. The aim is to develop the CET system with higher quality towards learning opportunities.   

Strategic direction towards CET in Singapore

With the use of the Singapore case, this evaluation report provides examples of the good international practices. The paper also examines the rationale and impact of the CET system into the educational sector. The report is focused on following objectives such as:

  • To evaluate the efficiency of CET system and enhance the economic competitiveness of Singapore
  • To develop the CET system with higher quality towards learning opportunities
  • To evaluate training as a challenge in Singapore among the young generations
  • To improve workplace training provision, workplace performance and productivity using CET system
  • To evaluate enhancement of CET system into literacy and numeracy among people of Singapore

The study helps the adults to improve their educational skills and training requirements in Singapore. The adult education system helps the student to enhance their literacy and knowledge areas. Postlethwaite and Thomas (2014) emphasized that comparative education system contributes to student's learning experiences, development training skills in addition to analytical skills. This study helps to understand how the educational system is shaped by the social as well as cultural features of Singapore. This evaluation study enables to understand the current education system and key challenges it faced in an age of globalization (Altbach 2015). It enables to identify how the education system develops with existing theories into the education. The purpose of the study is to reflect on the educational system to provide education to the students throughout technical skills. The evaluation report also suggested of improvements in training programmes to make sure that Singapore stayed ahead to have skilled workers for their economy. It also provides qualitative research plus an assessment of progress so far next to the future developments in the educational sector.

Darling-Hammond (2017) stated that Singapore's CET system provides training as well as education to different levels of workforces. The system is focused on vocational as it is opposed to the academic education. Tremewan (2016) argued that this particular system will improve both skills as well as knowledge of workforces throughout the training programmes. The policy aims to provide standards for measuring as well as evaluate the efficiency of the CET programmes for the adults in addition to youth. The educational sector prepares a plan to prepare the workers for future and then develop a competitive advantage for the Singapore (Carney 2014). The system helps the employers to enhance the quality as well as productivity to help the workers acquire the educational skills for industry's development. The educational system forms a learning system to help the workers find new growth in educational areas (Yang 2016). CET system is accessible and added value to the career of the Singaporeans.

While understanding the education system within Singapore, the educational development is based on three phases. The first phase is "survival-driven" aims to produce trained workforces in early years of independence. In late 1960, Singapore produced of skilled workers for an export familiarized economy. There is a shift from academic to the technical education. In late 1970, this phase was being replaced by "efficiency-driven" which aimed to produce skilled workers for an economy in an efficient way (Ssg-wsg.gov.sg, 2016). All the students in Singapore should study two languages such as English and Mother Tongue Language. There are three mother tongue languages are used by a government like Chinese for Chinese students, Malay for Malay students and Tamil for Indian students. Further, five more languages are added. However, it is evaluated that 20-30 percent of students are dropped out from the system as they are not coping with learning the two languages (Postlethwaite and Thomas 2014). The final phase is "ability driven" started in the year 1997, aims to build up creative thinking skills among the young generations. Under ability driven, the education is being premised on that belief that talents along with abilities are valuable. The CET system master plan emphasizes on providing diploma qualification to 60 percent of the resident workforces by the year 2020 as compared to 36 percent in 2007 (Ssg-wsg.gov.sg, 2015).  

Challenges and skills development

In response to the rapid evolving of the global working environment, Singapore is offering a flexible adult education system for continuing education as well as training purposes. The main feature of this particular system is to achieve career goals. Cai and Kosaka (2016) stated that CET system also offers with a flexible registration system for supporting the students enter into the workforces and give flexibility towards the evaluation study. Therefore, it provides a key achievement to meet the career goal.

There are four components of the Singaporean CET system. The features of the four components are listed as:

 Industry skills need: In the development of the workforce, CET system is a sectoral approach. There is system employer-led industry skills and training councils (ISTC) along with workforce skills training councils for the educational sector (Stromquist and Monkman 2014). There is a difference between two of the councils such that there is an additional role for the workforce training. The role of that council is to develop the strategic plan along with CET framework (Loh 2014). This component establishes of skills profile, identify the skills gap and provide of workforce skills qualifications (WSQ).

Curriculum design: There are received skills profiles as well as competency maps from ISTC; the CET system has curriculum design for designing different levels of WSQ qualifications (Knight 2015). The benefit of this component is to maintain control as well as take the actions when needed into the WSQ system to skill training actions.    

National qualifications framework: This reflects of important emphasis to employability skills along with occupational skills (Li et al. 2014).

A system of CET centres and Accredited Training Organizations (ATO): CET centres are sector-based training delivery bodies. The providers of training are set up to complete the training activities. The centres set their price for the training courses includes of WSQ and training courses (Hou et al. 2015). The major difference among CET centres as well as ATO is that the former groups tend to large with widespread infrastructure in addition to established reputation as a strong leader in training within the educational sector. CET centres are the main driving force behind the sectoral training. The centres are carried out of employment and training services to adults ranging from training, promotion and recruitment to concluding evaluation.  

Hung, Lee and Lim (2014) cited that using this system, the employers are guided to the educational process into the organization using a supervisory system. Each of the employers is assigned to three advisors; there is the main supervisor along with an advisor of the minor project. The CET system provides training to the employers who are most important for the job in which they are assigned with. The system provides full guidance to the employers for their education as well as research. It also offers with a career service office that guides the student as well as advice on the professional developments. Silver and Bokhorst-Heng (2016) mentioned this CET system provides all types of courses to the students and offers an opportunity to obtain a master degree to take courses taught in English and Singapore's languages. The system is offered with analytical, and knowledgeable skills like critical thinking, communicational skills to perform the job more perfectly (English 2016).  Therefore, it is analyzed that this particular education and training system has the main feature to meet with the career goal of the adults such as employers within an organization and students into schools as well as universities.    

International practices and educational development history

Postlethwaite and Thomas (2014) suggested that Singapore is adopted lifelong learning policies. Lin, Mokhtar and Wang (2015) demonstrated that Singapore is broadened of approach towards the lifelong learning policies which support superior completeness. The policies enable the workers to find out niches as well as the size of the opportunities into latest growth areas. Hung, Lee and Lim (2014) argued that national view of the policy remains a key significant means to facilitate towards productivity as well as employability of the educational sector. Therefore, expansion of CET system enhances literacy and numeracy among people of Singapore (Loo 2017). After evaluating the Singapore's adult education system, young adults within Singapore aged 16-34 years performed well to solve problems in technology, literacy as well as numeracy skills. The older adults within Singapore aged 55-65 years scores below the average. The result is to reflect on the progress of Singapore by developing education and training skills. According to Hou et al. (2015), adults within Singapore ranked 2nd into problem solving and 5th into numeracy while 9th in literacy. The older adults performed lower than an average of OECD countries in both literacy plus numeracy.

Singapore's WDA is focused on expanding the system in order to support capability in addition to productivity driven growth by the economic strategies. The key trusts behind the CET strategies are to enable people to provide deep skills and knowledge in their respective jobs, expansion of CET offerings to the managers, technicians, and professionals in addition to executives (Hazelkorn 2014). The workers have upgraded the skills throughout the "workforce training support scheme". Fitzsimons (2015) concluded that a significant learning policy is initiated by the government to encourage the schools to "teach less, learn more (TLLM)". The aim for the teachers is to teach better to engage students and prepare them for life rather than prepare them for examinations. In order to support the implementation of TLLM, the Ministry of Education reduced content into the curriculum such that the teachers get more space to make learning more engaged along with efficient (Tan 2014). Therefore, the students should get less time to study and efficient time to search interesting areas of learning. In order to motivate the teachers to break the old policy of learning such as "talk-and-chalk pedagogy", the schools place aside timetabled time for the teachers to engage them in specialized planning with reflection.

According to Walker and Musti-Rao (2016), the ministry of education explained that the schools could use their space for customization and development of educational content in addition to materials. Those changes assure to enable as well as authorize the teachers to acclimatize plus design proper pedagogy to raise imaginative with critical thinkers in the students. Regarding evaluation, the teachers of Singapore are recommended to move beyond concern on memorisation of the content knowledge as well as lower level of thinking skills. The Singapore's government values the student's competencies development like critical thinking, creative thinking, collaboration, lifelong learning, and innovation and communication technology (Postlethwaite and Thomas 2014). At the secondary level, the coursework is recommended as the school-based assessment. The examinations for the primary are being replaced by bite-sized assessment towards assessment to support the student learning. Therefore, it is hypothesized that:

Four Components of the Singaporean CET System

H1: Singapore's Adult Education systems enhance literacy and numeracy among people of Singapore.

H2: Leaning style of individual provides a positive impact on training's efficiency.

In spite of the success of Singapore's education system, Singapore continues to face educational challenges in a period of globalization. Aithal and Aithal (2016) discussed that globalization brought major effects which consist of denationalisation of the economics, commodification of the education, internationalisation as well as a weakening of nation-state. There is faster growth in demands for higher level skills. It hinges on how the countries are made progress to improve quality of education of people and also provide learning opportunities. Postlethwaite and Thomas (2014) concluded of challenges facing education into Singapore besides the backdrop of globalization. Training fatigue is a key significant issue within Singapore which is common among the young generations. This challenge reverses the intended effect of the CET system.  Stromquist and Monkman (2014) discussed the lower, as well as middle-class families, are not affording higher quality and expensive pre-school education. The teaching professionals in the pre-school education sector are not so much qualified, and there is insufficient training and career development plan which led to higher turnover into the pre-school.  

Sharifi, Liu and Ismail (2014) demonstrated that education system of Singapore could invest a greater amount of training as compared to an old system. The investigation analyzes Singapore's Adult Education framework to go for excellence for the student and offer of various decisions for the education. The major challenge that Singapore is facing is to assess the impact of the increasing investment of CET system into Singapore. "Centre for Evaluation and Innovation Research" has taken up the challenges by developing a framework to monitor as well as evaluate of the CET initiatives. They are engaged with the stakeholders and enabled the government to calculate results of CET, a study from implementation initiatives of CET in addition to exploiting the impacts of future CET initiatives. Warner et al. (2015) illustrated that there is collaboration among the governmental agencies to trace the effect of education as well as training. The CET system is also focused on the career of the trainers, change among education as well as training, and there is an evaluation of the training programmes. The result of this has provided a direct effect on the practice (Bruine de Bruin et al. 2015). The research into the trainer's lives with feeds into scope as well as the design of the professional development programmes and it is contributed to understanding the dynamics of training careers.  

Postlethwaite and Thomas (2014) concluded that from the above-identified challenges, it is cleared that there is a development of strong base for the evidence-informed policy as well as practice. And the development process faces two of the major challenges which are both practical as well as conceptual dimensions. The initial challenge is related to the engagement of the users as well as stakeholders. The second challenge is related to what is considered to count as evidence. Those two challenges are closely related to each other (Li et al. 2014). In this section, the analysis is based on two of the issues, and it is considered how those two are related to a national research association to create look into that has a most extreme effect and establish firm frameworks for evidence-informed policy as well as practice into CET system. For this purpose, we have chosen of evidence-informed policy. Hung, Lee and Lim (2014) argued that this distinction is made keeping in mind the end goal to be very evident that to create approaches and impact work on, something more than confirming from a look into research is required. There are, for example, factors, like explicit as well as tacit knowledge and judgment of experts to join and consider.

Suoranta (2017) demonstrated that this distinction likewise recognizes that overall conditions will shape practice, and that, whatever examination and different types of proof may propose, there are breaking points to what is conceivable, or attractive, in practice. Lin, Mokhtar and Wang (2015) mentioned that at the core of this approach is the responsibility regarding the exchange, in addition to the profitability of uniting, yet not settling into a solitary voice, extraordinary points of view, which themselves might be related with various interests and frameworks of significance. Singapore has many features in the development state which consists of formal reliance on the industrial policies to include structural changes towards new economic sectors. The structural changes are accomplished by the change in skills. Sharifi, Liu and Ismail (2014) stated that the requirement of employee's skills is changed with an increase in the demand for training skills.

Hill and Lian (2013) stated that Singapore is such a country that is showing of economic development. It creates the educational system for the employers as well as Singaporeans. Ellis and Armstrong (2014) examined that in the educational field; political issues happen. Most of the politicians are focused on how the schools are failing, and one of the solution or can say the only solution is standardization, testing as well as accountability (Tremewan 2016). The white-collar class as assigned here is comprised of experts and specialists and those occupied with authoritative in addition to administrative work. Administrative and office representatives, whose work happen in an alternate condition and are of an alternate sort, are excluded.

Lee (2014) demonstrated that this evaluation study examines the emergence as well as characteristics of the middle class of Singapore and discusses on the political control of the government along with discriminatory policies which can favour the growing classes. The policy maker can acknowledge the returns towards the education as the social investment. It is difficult for poor as well as middle-class people to find a path for the education. It is critical for them due to the poor condition of the family (Altbach 2015). The low-income family students have lack of social capital that would help them in navigating of the educational institutions. They also want to earn money as well want to study full time. They also leave their community to go to the good university. However, sometimes due to political pressure, they are lack of the education (Pennycook 2017). The big and huge problem into the education is also political interferences into the work of the classroom teachers.

Ellis and Armstrong (2014) mentioned that apart from the political issues, there are also other issues which become a barrier to the adult's educational system. There are existences of critical obstacles that prevent the education of people from the educational system. The learning of the student is everything from various pathways to graduation, empowering understudy voice in understudy learning, and empowering them has a place at the table for bigger discussions about the educational system of Singapore (Sharifi, Liu and Ismail 2014). The pre-service educational programs are improved, but it is not given to the professionals such as those are expertise in the particular field. It becomes an issue as the professionals also want to become more expert and gain more skills as well as knowledge.  The professions are wanted to learn and get knowledge as per their educational as well as training requirements. Therefore, it is efficient to provide all the educational benefit to all types of people those are a desire to learn and get training.

The sources of information are valuable to go through the research topic and help to separate data concentrated on the research necessities. There are two categories of data sources, for example, primary as well as secondary data sources. In this particular study, primary data sources are used. Bernard (2017) stated that the primary sources are utilized and the information is gathered by use of online survey. The researcher had spoken to the management of universities about their evaluation study to determine the efficiency or effectiveness of the CET system. The teachers of the universities help to organize the online survey for the employees so that the researcher can able to know how it is effective in providing training and enhancing literacy and numeracy among people. The survey is conducted online by sharing of questionnaire to the employees to gather their feedback. Blumberg, Cooper and Schindler (2014) stated that into any survey research, the questions are not linked to the personal information of the participants and all the information is to be kept secured into the university database.  Hair (2015) illustrated that the primary data are helping to collect the raw data which are directly catered as per requirement of the research topic.

Glesne (2015) stated that quantitative method is used in this evaluation study which consists of statistical data helped to record responses from larger sample size. Blumberg, Cooper and Schindler (2014) discussed that after collecting the data by use of primary data collection method, the gathered data are analyzed using the statistical form of data. Horsfall and Hayter (2014) stated that this method is used to uncover the trends into opinions and dives deeper into the problems. These data analysis methods emphasize the objective measurements, statistical as well as numerical analysis of the collected data by use of questionnaire and survey. Matthews and Ross (2014) illustrated that this method can manipulate the pre-existing statistical data by use of computational techniques.

Flick (2015) analyzed that the sample is considered to study the effectiveness of the CET system in Singapore and evaluate its enhancement into literacy and numeracy among people of Singapore. Mackey and Gass (2015) said that the employees of universities are asked for participation through online method based on Likert’s scale rating from 1 to 5. The sample size selected for data collection is 20. As this is an evaluation survey, therefore the researcher consolidated the raw data collection and then tabulated it into excel which are presented into the pie charts. The Likert scale is being applied to five choices for each question. The percentage for each response is presented into the pie charts.

While directing in addition to working into the research study, the analyst are required to take after set of accepted rules which help to distinguish wrong and right arrangement of practices expected to embrace amid the examination procedure. The ethical considerations are as follows:

 Information of participants: In order to ensure for anonymity, the answers of the questionnaire are not linked with any kind of their personal information. That information is to be kept confidential and data are kept in secured place.

Data application: Any commercial data is avoided such that the evaluation findings are limited for the academic purposes only. 

In light of the specified ethical considerations, the analyst is attempted to keep up with research morals in the examination. At the point when all the specified ethical contemplations are followed, it provides an outcome of complete of the evaluation report in a scheduled period.

This section analyzes the collected data from the online survey based on three levels asked on the questionnaires. The first section is based on a demographic profile of the participants and the second section is based on the selected research topic. 

Section A: Demographic profile

  1. Gender

Gender

No of participants

Total number of participants

Percentage of responses

Male

12

20

60%

Female

8

20

40%

Table 7.1: Gender percentage

From the above figure, it is analyzed that larger number of respondents are male (60%) and female (40%). Therefore, the male participants are more interested in getting involved with the training programs by use of Singapore adult education system.

  1. Age

Age

No of participants

Total number of participants

Percentage of responses

18-24 years

4

20

20%

25-29 years

13

20

65%

50-79 years

3

20

15%

Above 80 years

0

20

0%

Table 7.2: Age percentage

From the above figure, it is analyzed that larger proportion of the participants those are involved into the survey are between age 25-49 years (65%), 18-24 years (20%) and 50-79 years (15%). Therefore, most of the participants those are interested in the training program are adults. 

Section B: Evaluation study on Singapore's Adult Education system

Level 1: Economic competitiveness and adult’s satisfaction

  1. Do you engage in learning with use of the Singapore Adult Education System?

Options

No of participants

Total number of participants

Percentage of responses

Never

0

20

0%

Rarely

3

20

15%

Sometimes

4

20

20%

Often

4

20

20%

Always

9

20

45%

Table 7.3: Engagement in learning

From the above figure, it is analyzed that larger proportion of the participants are always (45%) engaged in learning by use of Singapore's adult education system. It is also analyzed that often (20%), sometimes (20%) and rarely (15%) those have impacts on economic competitiveness and adult's satisfaction. Due to a growing importance of learning, the proposed system becomes popular among people of Singapore to allow flexibility in learning, accessing of materials as per student's requirements. The system provides interactive materials allow easier access to the learning materials in addition to feedback from the students.

  1. Do you engage to attend career related course?

Options

No of participants

Total number of participants

Percentage of responses

Never

0

20

0%

Rarely

2

20

10%

Sometimes

4

20

20%

Often

6

20

30%

Always

8

20

40%

Table 7.4: Engaged to attend career related courses

From the above figure, it is analyzed that larger proportion of the participants are always (40%) engaged to attend career related courses. It is also analyzed that often (30%), sometimes (20%) and rarely (10%). Most of the workers of the various organization are upgraded their skills throughout the use of "workforce training support scheme". The adult education system provides key benefit in the areas of education as well as training to the workers and Singaporeans. The universities, as well as educational sectors, are playing a big role into an implementation of adult education with new skills and courses.

  1. How far do you agree that CET system enhance economic competitiveness of Singapore?

Options

No of participants

Total number of participants

Percentage of responses

Very satisfied

0

20

0%

Satisfied

15

20

75%

Neutral

2

20

10%

Dissatisfied

3

20

15%

Very dissatisfied

0

20

0%

Table 7.5: Enhancement of economic competitiveness of Singapore

From the above figure, it is analyzed that larger proportion of the participants are significant of 75% satisfied with the fact that the education system enhances the economic competitiveness of Singapore. The CET system is focused on those areas, and therefore the educational sector can successfully implement the system in their business operations. The government of Australia are continued to work for the building of close relationships with the employers as well as stakeholders to gain of economic competitiveness. The system has innovative funding mechanisms which turn the competitive environment for publicly funded training to become effective. The system can meet the requirements of educational industries as well as workforces.  

  1. How far do you agree that CET system enhances literacy among people?

Options

No of participants

Total number of participants

Percentage of responses

Very satisfied

1

20

5%

Satisfied

16

20

80%

Neutral

3

20

15%

Dissatisfied

0

20

0%

Very dissatisfied

0

20

0%

Table 7.6: Enhancement of literacy among people

From the above figure, it is analyzed that larger proportion of the participants are satisfied (80%) that the CET system enhances literacy among people. It helps to gain knowledge and skills. It is also analyzed that neutral (15%) and very satisfied (5%). The Singapore's adult education system is flexible as well as efficient along with it is coming in various forms.  The proposed system improves; updates the skills and knowledge along with expanding to encompass new fields as well as tasks. The CET activities are taking place with the formal education in addition to the training system. It provides job-related education as well as training activities to enhance literacy among people of Singapore.   

What are you experience in learning with use of CET system?

Options

No of participants

Total number of participants

Percentage of responses

Very satisfied

0

20

0%

Satisfied

16

20

80%

Neutral

3

20

15%

Dissatisfied

1

20

5%

Very dissatisfied

0

20

0%

Table 7.7: Experience in learning with use of CET system

From the above figure, it is analyzed that larger proportion of the participants are satisfied (80%) by getting experience into the learning of new skills and gaining of new knowledge which helps them in their workplace. CET system is focused on those areas, and therefore the educational sector can successfully implement the system in their business operations. The universities are developed of educational programs which bring academics into a facet of student experiences such as internships, language practice as well as travelling seminars with the local roommates. The CET system also helps to work together, offers the wealth of experience along with being practical and flexible in the learning activities. The proposed CET system also provides an experience which offers the student outstanding enrolment course options with the curricula, expects to involve into various learning styles and encourages the students to connect with local faculty in addition to students.

Level 2: Training of adults

  1. Did you gain new knowledge and skills from CET system?

Options

No of participants

Total number of participants

Percentage of responses

Not at all

0

20

0%

Slightly

3

20

15%

Somewhat

3

20

15%

Average

9

20

45%

Very

5

20

25%

 Table 7.8: Gaining new knowledge and skills from CET system

From the above figure, it is analyzed that average (45%) of the participants are satisfied that they are gaining required knowledge and skills from the CET system. 25% of them are very gaining, 15% of them are somewhat, and 15% of them are slightly gaining. The proposed CET system expects to provide innovative solutions to skills training which increases emphasis on the workplace training. With innovation into learning, the system integrated among the training institution as well as workplaces and among knowledge along with an application to enable the individuals to fulfil the requirements and build of competitiveness in Singapore. The system enhances competitiveness into the workforces by encouraging people of Singapore to gain new skills and knowledge in learning. The CET system upgrades the skills of the workers and helps them to become flexible as well as better to the transfer of skills. It provides of transferable services to the workers. The system helps the working people to keep their skills relevant as per their job requirements.

  1. How far do you agree that new skills and knowledge are useful for your job role?

Options

No of participants

Total number of participants

Percentage of responses

Very satisfied

1

20

5%

Satisfied

17

20

85%

Neutral

2

20

10%

Dissatisfied

0

20

0%

Very dissatisfied

0

20

0%

Table 7.9: New skills and knowledge are useful for the job role

From the above figure, it is analyzed that larger proportion of the participants are satisfied (85%) by gaining of skills and knowledge which is helpful for the job role of the participants. A collaborative relationship with the organization as well as stakeholders results into enabling to provide professional competencies, advancement in the career goals with increasing skills to work in the workplaces. The system mitigates the current skills gap which is required in the workplace to perform the job role. CET takes place on-the-job at the time of learning such as it helps to learn how a new task is performed. It enables the working adults regards their staring qualifications and continues to build deeper skills as well as competencies throughout their job role.

Options

No of participants

Total number of participants

Percentage of responses

Very satisfied

1

20

5%

Satisfied

16

20

80%

Neutral

3

20

15%

Dissatisfied

0

20

0%

Very dissatisfied

0

20

0%

Table 7.10: Use of CET system is useful for workplace training

From the above figure, it is analyzed that larger proportion of the participants are satisfied (80%) with use of CET system for workplace training. 15% of them are neutral, and 5% of them are very satisfied with the workplace training. The outcome of this evaluation study is that the CET system is fit to give more training preparation when contrasted with the old framework. Inside Singapore, there is set up training framework to bring out best into every child as well as learning space into each school. The sectors of Singapore are transformed and seek the workers with particular skills, training as well as adult education sector. It plays a key role in a building of up skilled workforces that are required to be upgraded to getting better training. The system provides on-the-job training to the new employees to improve their skills and knowledge as per their job role in the organization. It allows the trainees to apply for new found skills as well as knowledge along with receiving of relevant feedback for further improvements. Therefore, CET professionals are playing a role to facilitate workplace learning. The CET professionals are exploring innovative ways to train the employees.    

Level 3: Productivity of business

  1. How far do you agree that CET system help raise productivity and performance of business?

Options

No of participants

Total number of participants

Percentage of responses

Very satisfied

0

20

0%

Satisfied

17

20

85%

Neutral

3

20

15%

Dissatisfied

0

20

0%

Very dissatisfied

0

20

0%

Table 7.11: CET system helps to raise productivity and performance of business

From the above figure, it is analyzed that larger proportion of the participants are satisfied (85%) with the CET system that the system helps to raise the productivity of the business. 15% of neutral said that when the employees are gaining of knowledge as well as skills, then it increases the productivity of the company. The educational sector should also increase the growth of the system and implemented of more and more system to provide training as well as education to targeted population. CET system should gain productivity and performance by developing competence into complex tasks, master of skills as well as depth into expertise into each trade as well as professions. The organization should able to produce more goods with same amount of human resources.   

  1. Do the involvement of adults and their knowledge improve?

Options

No of participants

Total number of participants

Percentage of responses

Never

0

20

0%

Rarely

2

20

10%

Sometimes

6

20

30%

Often

8

20

40%

Always

4

20

20%

Table 7.12: Involvement of adults and their knowledge improve

From the above figure, it is analyzed that larger proportion of the participants are often (40%), sometimes (30%), always (20%) and rarely (10%) responses that the system improves the involvement of adults and knowledge. The CET system helps to provide training after initial education into the work life which helps individuals to modify the knowledge as well as skills for acquiring of new skills for the career goal. By improving over knowledge, it helps Singaporeans to secure their job, get higher income as well as enjoy of higher living standards. Improvement of the knowledge helps during the downtime of the company to prepare the works for economic recovery.  

Conclusions and Recommendations 

Conclusions

It is concluded that inside Singapore, there is set up of training framework to bring out best into each child as well as learning space into each school. The framework sets up the value affirmation for the general population certainty, actualizes the legitimate preparing, builds up of congruity for preparing and advances of vital abilities arrangement. The CET framework incorporates inside and our expertise with the workforce of Singapore with expanding the relationship of businesses into working and also esteeming abilities. The framework additionally empowers managers to learn through instruction, preparing alongside vocation direction. The instruction framework adds to understudy's learning encounters; create of preparing aptitudes along with logical abilities. This investigation sees how the educational system is shaped by the social and also social highlights of Singapore. This assessment considers empowers to comprehend the education system in a less demanding path by perceiving the courses. The educational sector prepares a plan to prepare the workers for future and then develop a competitive advantage for Singapore. The system reflects important emphasis on employability skills along with occupational skills.

Following are the recommendations for the development of Singapore's education system used for training and education purposes as:

Greater efficiency into the system: As adult education system is benefited the employers as well as Singaporeans, therefore the system should enhance its efficiency by introducing ability based streaming for the weakest students into the secondary school. Students are assessed based on their language level and streamed into various courses at both primary as well as secondary schools.

Address the requirements of workforce and skills: Before the use of this system, the educational institutions should address and estimate requirements of the resources and technical skills to handle the system. If there is lack of technical skills, then the workers are not able to use the system. Therefore, proper technical training is required to handle the system and understand the use of the system. There is the requirement for establishment of skills profile, identify the skills gap, also, to provide of workforce skills qualifications.

The above mentioned recommendations are provided to the educational sector so that more adult educational system should be implemented and adopted by them. It is also recommended that the training provider should use this system so that they can provide better training as well as education to the employers along with the students. Mostly, the system benefits the educational sector in addition to universities along with workplaces. The educational system should benefit the employers along with Singaporeans to meet their career goals as well as objectives while working in the workplace and studying in the university

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