Get Instant Help From 5000+ Experts For
question

Writing: Get your essay and assignment written from scratch by PhD expert

Rewriting: Paraphrase or rewrite your friend's essay with similar meaning at reduced cost

Editing:Proofread your work by experts and improve grade at Lowest cost

And Improve Your Grades
myassignmenthelp.com
loader
Phone no. Missing!

Enter phone no. to receive critical updates and urgent messages !

Attach file

Error goes here

Files Missing!

Please upload all relevant files for quick & complete assistance.

Guaranteed Higher Grade!
Free Quote
wave
Idea of the project

Discuss About The Sustainability Early Childhood Education.

Developing a summer programme for a Montessori school is essential to provide several benefits to a child. The focus of the programme is to help in the development of key stages in the lives of the children. The relevance of the project is that it can help in setting up a programme that can assist in the development of the children. It can help in encouraging the cooperative play of a child and ensure that the children can develop self-discipline by choosing the activities that suit their style of understanding. It is to be noted that the classroom environment teaches children to maintain order and therefore helps in unleashing the creativity of the children. The project focuses on the development and the management in which the Montessori programmes can be applied for the proper development of the children. The idea is to create a programme that can promote the importance of school life within the children. The project focuses on the summer Montessori programme undertaken in Vilnius Montessori School situated in Lithuania (Vms.lt 2018). The programme aims to explore the creativity side of the children for future development process.

The idea of the project is to maintain the interest among the children regarding the manner in which schooling can benefit them. The interest towards attending school can be developed with the help of the programme. As such, various types of Montessori programmes can be set up such as developing exercise of practical life, language and mathematics for the children enrolled in the Vilnius Montessori School (Vms.lt 2018). These essential programmes can help the children to understand the basic concepts of the subjects and accordingly ensure that the creativity within the children is developed. The children of the school can be more effective in developing skills that are required for success in the school life. At the same time, the idea of the project is to develop a classroom environment so that the children can understand the ways to behave in a classroom and the interaction between the children and the teachers can be prolonged due to the implementation of such programmes.

The aim of the project is to develop a summer Montessori programme for the development of creativity skill for the children in Vilnius Montessori School (Vms.lt 2018). To do so it is necessary that the participants be divided into various groups and based on the groups the programmes are developed. The aim is to ensure that the children of Vilnius Montessori School are well prepared to start a school life and develop properly in the society. At the same time, the aim is to ensure that self-confidence and academic skills of the children are developed so that it can help them in the future. Encouragement of the cognitive and learning skills are developed so that the children can be creative and a particular subject can be studied in a fun manner. Therefore, the development of the children is the focus of the project.

Aim of the project

The objectives of the project include:

  • To develop a summer Montessori programme that can be effective for developing the confidence among the children in Vilnius Montessori School
  • To identify the aspects of the summer Montessori programme held in Vilnius Montessori School
  • To analyse the benefits of the summer Montessori programme held in Vilnius Montessori School
  • To identify the resources required and the reasons for acquiring these resources
  • To provide recommendations about the manner in which the summer Montessori programme can be improved further in Vilnius Montessori School

The method that can be used for completing the project is the evaluation and analysis method. With the application of this theoretical method, the project can be conducted in a more critical manner. Moreover, the application of the evaluation and analysis method can help in identifying the pros and cons behind the Montessori programmes undertaken by the Vilnius Montessori School (Vms.lt 2018). An empirical assessment is also conducted that helps in analysing the risk involved with the project. The risk analysis can be done based the financial and resource requirement necessary for the development of the programme.

Summer Montessori programme consist of activities that help children to develop self-confidence. During the school days, the teachers assign tasks to the students that need to be completed on time. According to Lillard et al. (2017), the Montessori programmes can help the students in completing such tasks and ensure that they become ready for schooling. The Montessori programmes or pre-school programmes help children to be prepared about the basics that are required for developing in class. The basic mathematics and literature are taught to the students in a manner that can help them to gain interest in the subjects. The summer Montessori programme help in developing various skills among the children that can be used in the future. The supervisors involved in the Montessori programmes help in guiding the students and encouraging them to remain disciplined during the programme (Franc and Subotic 2015). However, these programmes may incur a huge outflow of cash, as the cost required for setting up such programmes can be expensive. Therefore, it is necessary to prepare a proper project plan so that the cost factor and the risks involved in the application of the project can be identified.

The purpose of the project is to ensure that proper Montessori programme can be developed so that the children have an idea about the manner in which they can present themselves in school. The focus is on the development of the children enrolled in the Vilnius Montessori School situated in Lithuania. The talent and focus of the children can be developed with the introduction of such programmes and the interest of the children can be analysed by the tutors and the parents. Moreover, it is also essential that the children develop their cognitive skills and with the application of the programme, they can develop it in a more comprehensive manner. Moreover, the project is useful in developing possible results that can help in understanding the development of summer Montessori programme in Vilnius Montessori School and its effectiveness in the upbringing of the children (Vms.lt 2018). The development of skills such as the mathematical skills as well as the language grasping skills can be analysed by the help of the project. Therefore, it can be said that the purpose of the project is to analyse the importance of Montessori programmes and the benefit it can provide in the development of the children. The project is based on focusing on the pros and cons of the Montessori programmes so that the skills of the children can be developed in a proper manner.

Objectives of the project

Children enrolled in Montessori schools can learn up to five things that can help in the proper development of their growth. The experiences of the children about the manner in which they need to behave in schools are provided along with gaining an idea of the subjects that is to be taught. In the case of the Summer Montessori programme of Vilnius Montessori School, five things need to be present that can help in the development of the children. These include:

Practical life: The lessons taught to students in this case comprises of the care of other people and the environment. These are considered as valuable life lessons as it helps in the development of the children at an early age. Handy activities are encouraged so that the children can learn to work with small things that may have a big impression in the future. Activities such as pouring tea or water, sewing old toys or clothes, polishing of mirrors, peeling of carrots and so on are considered important for the development of the children (Mitchel and Mead 2017). The practical life lessons can help in preparing the children in all other subjects that may have a valuable impact in their lives. These activities help in developing concentration, independence and coordination with one another.

Sensorial: This involves the application of the five senses that help in the development of the children. According to Nitecki (2015), the sensorial training is provided to help in sharpening the senses. In the case of Vilnius Montessori School, this is important as the school normally targets children that range between the ages from Toddlers to 6 years. Therefore, it is necessary that the children be developed at this stage so that they can develop their senses. For example, grasping the doorknob or understanding things by the smell, can help the children to develop the hand and nose muscles. Pate et al. (2014) stated that the sensory development of the children could help them in their pursuit of a good academic career as well. This is because with the help of the senses the children can distinguish the important subjects from the less important ones.

Language: According to Pearson (2016), language is used in a phonetic manner in Montessori schools. Without learning the alphabets, children cannot form words or make spellings from it. In a reputed Montessori school like Vilnius Montessori School, the training of the language is provided with the help of audio, matchboxes and sandpaper letters. After teaching the students about the various sounds of the alphabets the critical application of the alphabets in different words are taught. At the same time use of writing pencils and colour pencils are taught to the children.

Methods used in the project

Mathematics: Vilnius Montessori School provide opportunities to children to learn about mathematics and calculations by using simple examples as exercises. Simple counting is done by the use of pictures, fruits, sticks, tiles and so on. Number boards and games are provided to the students that help them to learn about counting and the manner in which it can be used in the future. One of the important things that Vilnius Montessori School provide to the students is the fact that each of the mathematical exercises are linked to one another that helps in guiding the mathematical minds of the children. The abstract areas of numerology are exposed that helps in the development of the children.

Cultural: The cultural areas that need to be taught to children are divided into geography, history, science and natural environment. In Vilnius Montessori School, the children are taught these subjects with the help of artificial items already present in the class. For example, maps, globes and pictures of historical people are kept in the classrooms that help them to learn about the nations and the people that matter most for the development of the nation. As observed by Peng (2014) history also helps in understanding the development of changes in the society. Another important thing that occurs in the school is the celebration of the birthdays. During the birthday of any children, cakes are distributed and the birthday child is allowed to wear special colourful dress to mark the occasion. Teaching the others to wish the child is also taught at the school.

These skills can help developing the creative nature of the children and ensure that the creative attitude is carried forward during the development of their career. Therefore, based on the analysis of the lessons that can be provided to the children, it can be said that a SWOT analysis can be drawn that can help in understanding the advantages and limitations of the summer Montessori programme.

Strength

·         Involvement of large number of professors and students

·         Early development of the children

·         Valuable service provided

·         Focus on real life issues

Weakness

·         Budget of the event

·         Reluctance of the parents to sent the children to the summer Montessori programme

·         Less applied knowledge

·         Little information regarding scope of future development

Opportunity

·         Develop a competitiveness among the children

·         Develop innovative and training programmes

·         Create networks

·         Formulate a partnership with business environment

Threat

·         Focus more on the training programmes

·         Excess investment in the human resource

·         Decrease the self-reliance for external source of funding

·         More importance on the training programme

Table 1: SWOT analysis of summer Montessori programme

(Source: Created by author)

The analysis of the SWOT show that summer Montessori programmes have various advantages that can be used by Vilnius Montessori School. For example, the summer programmes help in the early development of the children and ensure that valuable services are provided to them so that they can get a proper school life. Real life situations are used as examples to train the children. Support from various professors can be obtained for the programme.

Analysis of the purpose and typology of the project

However, the budget can be a factor for Vilnius Montessori School. The school needs to ensure that the budget is maintained in a manner that can help in providing the best development practises to the children. Applied knowledge can be less as children may interest themselves to be involved in games rather than academics. Therefore, parents may be reluctant to send the children to these creative learning programmes in fear that money may be spent without proper application of knowledge.

At the same time opportunities can be received that help in the development of competitiveness among the children. Innovation and methods of training programme are development so that the children can apply the knowledge they learn theoretically on a practical level. Networks are created that can help Vilnius Montessori School to remain in contact with other Montessori schools in the area and form business partnership.

The treats related to the application of the programme are that Vilnius Montessori School may tend to use the programme in an excessive manner for training children. Heavy reliance on the programme rather than actual schoolwork may be of ill effects for the children. Along with this, the reliance on the capabilities possess by Vilnius Montessori School may be decreased as the collaboration similar schools may increase the dependence in forming partnerships.

The typology for conducting the project involves a systematic application of different possibilities. The identification of the project is done based on the current requirement in the pre-school stages for the development of the children. Based on this, the project focuses on the methods that can be used for conducting a proper analysis. The choice of Montessori programmes is taken based on the importance of developing children and the future generation. The report also focuses on the application of the theoretical and empirical methods and the manner in which it can help in conducting the project. The problem is identified and the feasibility of the study is analysed. management, a project plan is developed that can help in analysing the effects of setting up such programme and the results that can be expected from it. The stakeholders involved in the project are analysed and the possible cash flow that it may incur are analysed so that the project can be conducted in a proper manner. Based on the analysis conclusions are drawn about the effects of a Montessori programme. The conclusions are linked with the objectives of the research so that the validity and feasibility of the project can be understood. Furthermore, recommendations are provided that highlight the ways to improve the Montessori programmes for the development of the children.

Things that can be taught to the students

Theoretical

According to Bryman and Bell (2015), the theoretical methods that can be used for the completion of the project can be the analytical method and the evaluation method. The analytical method is a process that combines scientific method and the application of the formal process to solve problems. It is a systematic analysis of the project at hand and the manner in which current methods can be applied for analysis. The important step in the analytical method is to identify an appropriate process for conducting a project (Sekaran and Bougie 2016). In this case, the application of Montessori programmes for the benefit of Vilnius Montessori School can be deduced by the application of the analytical method and the importance of selecting this type of programme are provided. At the same time, the research uses the evaluation method for the proper analysis of the problem. As stated by Denzin (2017) the evaluation method mainly focuses on the application of qualitative data and quantitative data so that effective results can be obtained. In this case, to gain a proper overview of the project the application of the evaluation method can be useful. The importance of managing a Montessori programme in Vilnius Montessori School can be analysed with the application of the evaluation process so that the budget and the risks involved can be analysed in a critical manner.

Empirical

The empirical research method uses evidence to conclude a result regarding a particular project. This requires direct and indirect observation of the programmes or projects that are being undertaken. In this, case the empirical research that is being conducted uses the risk analysis assessment method (Smith 2015). The risk analysis assessment helps to identify the type and level of risks that are involved in a project and the manner in which it can be mitigated. It involves in identifying the most probable risks that the Montessori programmes undertaken by Vilnius Montessori School may face while trying to be successful in the development of children. This particular research methodology can be useful for this case as the risks involved in the summer Montessori programmes can be analysed and provided as evidence for continuing with the programme. Therefore, the effective application of the two models can help in the proper conduct of the research (Taylor, Bogdan and DeVault 2015).

In order to conduct the project in a manner it is necessary to divide the group of participants. The sample size of the population is determined after considering the position of the children enrolled in Vilnius Montessori School. The children are chosen based on the academic interests that have been shown along with the interest in other curriculum activities. Therefore, the children can be categorised in terms of age. Vilnius Montessori School provides the provision to enrol children of different age limits. The communities of children aged 3-6 and a toddler community that enrols children of age 1 and half to 3 years of age (Vms.lt 2018). These two categories can provide an understanding of the type of interest that the children possess. Therefore, the divided group of participants of the project can be 10 children from each age group so that a symmetrical analysis can be provided, that highlights the interest of the children and the manner in which the Montessori programmes can be effective.

The project may undergo a few problems that may have a significant impact on its proper execution. One of the major problems that the project may undergo is the responses of the children. The target children are Toddlers and not matured group therefore, the instant positive response to such a programme may not be received initially. The children may show a sense of resistance at being under a care of people other than the parents. At the same time, the children may feel that they are being pressured to undertake courses that are not to their liking. Vilnius Montessori School may have to deal with the financial factor of the school. The Montessori Schools generally does not have much financial stability mostly because it is associated with the development of the children and does not have a profit motive intention in business (Pate et al. 2014). Therefore, the Vilnius Montessori School may also have to face such a difficulty while trying to cope up with implementing educational policies.

Therefore, the budget of the school needs to be analysed so that such an expensive and enormous programme can be executed. The responses of the parents of the children can be considered as another problem that the project may face. This is mainly because of the fact that the parents may be reluctant to send their children particular the Toddlers away from home on a lengthy basis. Therefore, this may be a huge problem for understanding the success of the project. The support from the Government is another issue that may be faced by Vilnius Montessori School (Vms.lt 2018). This is because the Government of Lithuania may be reluctant to allow such a programme against the economy of the country.

Policies may be imposed that disallow children to participate in the Montessori programmes. Vilnius Montessori School may also lack the number of employees that can be willing to participate in the programme. This is because the staffs of the schools may be engaged in developing children that are a little older than the 6 years old. The matter of finance also comes into focus in this case, as the staffs may be unwilling to work extra without proper payment. Therefore, the full support of the staffs may not be received by the school. Hence, it can be said that these are some of the problems that Vilnius Montessori School may face while trying to establish a proper Montessori programme.

According to Smith (2015), the feasibility of a project can be considered based on the viability of the idea it provides. The legal and technical feasibility of a project can be determined based on the manner in which the public receives it. In the case of the Montessori project, the technical feasibility can be project can be determined by the support it receives from the Government and the legal obligations its follows while conducting the programme. Therefore, it is the duty of Vilnius Montessori School to comply with the legal systems of Lithuania and ensure that latest technology is adopted to continue with the Montessori programme. However, the legal and technical factors do not always allow a project to be doable. The problems stated above can be considered the reasons behind the non-feasibility of the projects. Despite this, it can be said that in the case of Vilnius Montessori School, the project undertaken can be considered as feasible owing to the support and response it has received from the Government and the local people. The fact that Vilnius Montessori School is one of the top Montessori schools of Lithuania provides it with an opportunity to continue with the programme in an effective manner. Therefore, it can be said that the feasibility of the project undertaken by Vilnius Montessori School can be attributed to the popularity of the school.

The title of project is Summer Montessori Programme in pre-school. The focus is on the summer programme developed by Vilnius Montessori School situated in Lithuania to encourage creative learning among the children. Based on this a plan for the project can be formulated.

  1. Relevance of the project

The relevance of the project is that it can be related to the strategic business interest from the promotion of a Montessori school. Hands, Sethi and Engram (2016) are of the opinion that an organisation usually undertakes a project so that it can provide stability in terms of finances. The financial gains of a company can help in a competitive environment. The strategic business interest of a particular organisation can be executed by completing a project successfully. Therefore, it can be said that a project can help in the development of an organisation and help in releasing the potential it has in the competitive market. The resources and financial condition of a company can be judged by undertaking a project that may be challenging for the company. Therefore, it can be said that undertaking a project can provide a company with an opportunity to remain active in the competitive market. However, as stated by Peng (2014) certain problems may arise for the successful completion of the project. For example, restriction from the Government can be considered as a major challenge that can be faced by a company. At the same time, lack of finances and resources may prove to be a challenging factor that needs to be overcome in order to complete a successful project. Therefore, a more specific relevancy of projects can be provided by analysing the effectiveness of the Summer Montessori Programme undertaken by Vilnius Montessori School for developing the creative side of the children.

The relevance of the project undertaken by Vilnius Montessori School is that it can help in the development of imagination and creativity of the children. The upbringing of the children so that they can have a proper livelihood is one of the aims of the school and therefore, the initiative taken can help in the strategic business interest (Vms.lt 2018). Therefore, the strategic business interest of the school is directed more towards gaining popularity in the community and helping in the growth of the children. However, certain problems can be faced by the school while trying to complete the programme. One such problem can be the lack of efficient staffs. Providing proper care to the children can be considered as a challenging task and therefore, most of the staffs may back out from undertaking such a project (Banks and Maixner 2016). At the same time, problems may arise while trying to convince the children and the parents to enrol in the summer programme undertaken by the school.

The aim of the programme is to develop children and ensure that the creativity and cognitive abilities are recognised. This can help in the future growth of the children and provide them with an opportunity to have a secured educational and professional life. Therefore, the objective of the summer programme includes:

  • To develop the children in a manner so that they can realise their creativity
  • To ensure that the potential qualities of the children are identified
  • To develop a proper growth in the community
  • To ensure that the programme is conducted with minimum risk
  1. Specific aspects of the project

The project is directed at the development of the children in the Montessori schools. The effectiveness of the project is to ensure that it can inspire the community and children can be enrolled in the summer programmes. The priority aspects of the risks that may be considered for the project is the budget. Without proper finances, the project cannot be undertaking properly and therefore, the development of the children may be hampered. Hence, the main stages for the implementation of the programme are that it needs to start by identifying the financial aspects and continue to develop its resources as it progresses.

  1. Expected results of the project

The results that may be achieved from conducting this programme is that the interests of the children can be identified and based on the interest, the children can be developed. At the same time additional results that can be obtained from the programme is the fact that Vilnius Montessori School can grow in popularity for its extra and creative care provided to the children. This can help the school to maintain its competitive advantage in the community and gain more popularity among the people (Refer to appendix 1 for SMART analysis).

  1. Project benefits

The positive results of the programme can be that the interests of the children can be identified. The development of the creativity of the children can take place in proper manner so that it can help the parents and the teachers to formulate a distinct course that can be undertaken in the future. At the same time, the programme can help children develop a social life and ensure that Toddlers develop a habit of going to school. However, negative results may hinder the progress of the school. Vilnius Montessori School can lose its reputation in the community and may result in financial loss for the school.

  1. Project stakeholder analysis

The main stakeholder of Vilnius Montessori School is the parents and the children. This is mainly because of the fact that they provide investments and help in maintaining a stable financial condition of the school. The participation of the stakeholders can be based on the manner in which the programme can be developed and a positive result of the programme may ensure that investments can be made on the development of the programme in the future. Therefore, the stakeholder of the school will play a major role in the help the success of the summer programme.

  1. Project risk assessment

The risk factors that may be considered for the programme includes budget and resources. These risks may arise due to the lack of cooperation from the stakeholders and the lack of interest shown by the parents and children in the community. These risks can provide Vilnius Montessori School with a huge disadvantage as the proper execution of the summer programme cannot be attained. However, there are manner in which these risks can be mitigated. The budget of the school can be maintained by utilising the finances in a proper manner and the resources mainly the human resource can be managed by inspiring the people to undertake the programme.

  1. Requirements

The requirement that has been set for the programme keeping in mind the issues that may arise in the business includes proper strategic analysis of the resources. Vilnius Montessori School need effective resources so that the school can implement the summer programme in an effective manner. At the same time, the school requires the support from the Government and the local community so that it can be encouraged to continue with the project and ensure that an effective programme is maintained. Hence, this can help the school to identify and mitigate any possible threats that the summer Montessori programme may face.

  1. Reasons for the resources that is required in the project

The resources that is required for completing the project in a successful manner includes the staffs and financial stability. At the same time in the world of technology, it is necessary that proper technical assistance be maintained so that the programme can be recorded and analysis of the recording can be done in the future. The financial resource is needed so that extra benefits can be provided to the children and the programme can be enhanced beyond the two months limit if needed.

  1. Project partners and participants

The participants for the preparation of the project include the staffs of Vilnius Montessori School. The teachers and the support staff involved in the school can participate in setting up the summer Montessori programme. However, the real participants of the programme need to be children. Children of two different age categories namely, the Toddler category between the age one and half years to 3 and children aged between 3 years to 6 years need to be main participants of the project. 20 children, 10 each of both the groups can be involved in the participating in the programme.

  1. Project activities and their schedule

The summer Montessori programme need to be conducted in a systematic manner each day so that the programme can be successfully implemented. The programme can begin at 11 a.m with the introduction of the children with the teachers and other support stuffs. Visual presentation of different games, music, literature and mathematics can follow in succession. Encouraging the children to talk about their interests can be conducted after lunch while the closure of the programme can be done at 4 p.m. This can provide a stress free environment to the children and they can get an idea about the proceedings that go on in a school (Refer to appendix 2 for Gantt chart).

  1. Project budget

The project budget that needs to be developed keeping in mind the requirements of the school and the programme. It has already been stated that the project require the support of the community and the staffs involved in the school. Therefore, it is necessary to make proper payment to the employees so that they continue developing the interest on the summer programme. Moreover, setting up the place for the execution of the programme also requires huge financing (Refer to appendix 3 for project budget).

  1. Project communication plan

The results of the success of programme can be provided by putting up notices and achievements in the billboards of the school. The billboards can be placed outside the school and inside it so that the stakeholders such as the parents and children can be a witness of the success. The specific primary aim of Vilnius Montessori School is that it needs to promote itself in the community and ensure that more children can enrol in the future summer programmes that the schools may undertake. Hence, the future summer Montessori programmes that Vilnius Montessori School can be notified in the billboards along with the contents. However, the flexible factor can be the time that needs to be decided after analysing the responses of the children and parents about the next programme.

  1. Project closure

The programme as well as the results from the implementation of the programme can be applied to understand the learning level and capacity of the children. Vilnius Montessori School can set up the summer Montessori programme to analyse the learning capacity of the children that may suffer from mental issues. This can help in encouraging these children to take up activities of their choices and hope to resolve in stereotype attitude that they may receive in the future. The programme can be closed in a formal manner by asking the children to provide their feedback about the level of enjoyment they received. The parents can be asked to provide a feedback about the satisfaction that they received and the changes (if any) observed within the children during the course of the programme. Legal documents and papers that highlight the participation of the children and any financial contributions that has been made need to be provided to the parents as evidence of the programme.

Conclusion

Based on the analysis of the programme it can be concluded that Vilnius Montessori School can benefit from the programme undertaken for the development of the children. The manner in which the interest of the children can be developed is mainly based on the creativity of the children. Therefore, a link can be made with the objectives that were stated as part of the completion of the project.

To develop a summer Montessori programme that can be effective for developing the confidence among the children in Vilnius Montessori School

It has been seen that the Vilnius Montessori School has taken a giant step in promoting the summer Montessori programme required for the development of the children. The problems that may arise in the implementation of the programme can be mitigated by proper analysis of the capabilities of the school. It has been seen that the confidence in the children at the school can be enhanced by the application of the programme so that they can develop their talents for the future. Hence, it can be said that the children in Vilnius Montessori School are provided with an effective programme so that the future of the children can be enhanced.

To identify the aspects of the summer Montessori programme held in Vilnius Montessori School

The summer Montessori programme held at Vilnius Montessori School can be considered as important for the development of the children. The school takes proper care of the Montessori children and ensure that the talents in the children are highlighted and brought in the limelight. Therefore, the aspect of the programme is that the children are provided with the encouragement to show their creativity and the interaction with the teachers provides them with an opportunity to develop special bond with them. Hence, it can be concluded that the step taken by the Vilnius Montessori School to implement the summer Montessori programme denotes the urge of the school to gain importance in the community.

To analyse the benefits of the summer Montessori programme held in Vilnius Montessori School

The benefits of the summer Montessori programme is that it can help the children to develop their skills in terms of learning, organising, maintaining discipline and interacting with other people aside from family members. The various interactions that are made with the teachers and other children of the same age can help in the development of communication skills. Apart from this, the guidance provided by the teachers can help the children to maintain discipline within the school as well as apply the discipline at home and other social places. Therefore, it can be said that the benefits of the summer Montessori programme can help to develop educational skills as well as abstract skills vital for future.

To identify the resources required and the reasons for acquiring these resources

The resources required for conducting a successful summer Montessori programme includes financial, technical and human power. These resources can be used effectively to ensure that the programme is conducted with a minimum risk and full potential. It has been seen that the school staffs does not show much interest in the summer programme mainly due to the less pay it incurs. However, it is necessary to understand that the support of the employee is required for successfully conducting the campaign. The finances of the school are required to maintain the budget and ensure that the programme does not have any shortcomings during its implementation process. Thus, it can be concluded that the resources for this programme are essential for the growth of the children.

To provide recommendations about the manner in which the summer Montessori programme can be improved further in Vilnius Montessori School

The analysis of the project have provided with an opportunity to provide certain recommendations for Vilnius Montessori School. The summer Montessori programme can use proper funding so that it can maintain a proper programme for the children. The programme can be based on the effectiveness and participation of the children and therefore, it is necessary that the school manage to gain the interest of the children and the consent of the parents. This can be done based on the effective analysing of the requirement of the community and by implementing the existing resources in a positive manner.

Therefore, it is recommended that the project be undertaken based on the solely due to the development of the children. Vilnius Montessori School need to keep in the mind the ultimate aim of the school and ensure that it is followed so that the children are not deprived of education or creative learning. The teachers involved with the school must ensure that the interaction with the children is made in a proper manner so that the children can rely on the teachers for guidance and assistance. At the same time, the teachers need to ensure that the cognitive learning of the children is encouraged. This is because the main purpose of the summer programme is to develop self-confidence among the children and the encouragement of the cognitive learning can help the children to remain motivated about learning. Along with this, it is necessary that Vilnius Montessori School provide proper wages and salary to the staffs participating in the summer programmes. One of the drawbacks that the programme is tipped to face is the resistance from the teachers. This is because the teachers and other support staff pose dissatisfaction over the payment made for continuing in the summer Montessori programme.

Other recommendations that can be made are in the form of managing the level of finance of the school. It has been seen that Vilnius Montessori School has made significant progress in the community as a leading Montessori school situated in Lithuania. Therefore, the finance of the school needs to be maintained properly so that the programme can be continued in an effective manner. The importance of this particular recommendation is that Vilnius Montessori School would not like to have any shortcomings that may hinder the progress of the school or the programme that has been undertaken. Without proper application of finances, the budget of the school cannot be maintained. Therefore, the budget needs to be made in such a manner that covers any emergence costs that may have to be incurred during the course of the project. Additional funding from the Government of the country can be a tactic undertaken by Vilnius Montessori School. The support from the Government is important as it helps in providing assistance with any type of legal matters that may concern the continuation of the programme. Therefore, it can be said that Vilnius Montessori School can involve the Government so that proper support can be received in terms of maintaining the legality of the programmes.

The other most important recommendation that can be made is the improvement of technology. The technology of the school need to match with the technical development that has been made in the current society. Every programme or activity needs to be assisted by the latest technologies that have evolved over the years. In the case of Vilnius Montessori School, it is necessary that the technologies be used so that children can understand the application of technology in the modern world and the manner in which it can be used for every purpose. The application of the technology in this case needs to be such that the audio and video sessions for the children can be conducted in a proper manner. The method of providing education in the modern world is mainly dependent upon the application of the technologies and it is necessary that Vilnius Montessori School develop the technologies such as proper projectors, internet connections and latest software in computers so that children can develop special interest in the education. Therefore, the financial capacity of the school also needs to be developed to maintain the technical prowess of Vilnius Montessori School.

The relevance of the project is that aims at providing assistance in the development of the children in terms of their interests in specific subjects so that the children may be encouraged to think in a creativity manner. The aim is to encourage the children to learn in a cognitive manner and develop an interest in the field of study that is required for the development of the future. The objectives of the project are to identify the benefits that can be achieved by Vilnius Montessori School after developing this programme. The resources needed for the implementing of the programme in a positive and successful manner is another objective of the report. However, successful implementation of the Montessori programme may be hampered by certain problems such as reluctance of participation of the staffs and children. At the same, time the financial position of the school need to be analysed so that the problems regarding budgeting of the programme can be mitigated. The methods used for conducting the project are the theoretical and empirical methods and the results obtained from these methods can help in the development of the children in Vilnius Montessori School. The feasibility of the study is determined by the manner in which the legal and technical factors may affect the success of the programme. Therefore, the programmes are necessary for developing the learning capacity of the children even and ensure that the interaction, communication and discipline of the children are developed. The project follows a systematic analysis of developing a project plan for its proper implementation of the Montessori programme.

References

Akbarzadeh, M. and Solgi, R., 2015. The applicability of Montessori Method in preschool. Pearson

Akhsanova, L.N. and Salyakhova, G.I., 2016. English teaching features on the basis of Montessori system among preschool age children (working experience). International Journal of Humanities and Cultural Studies (IJHCS)? ISSN 2356-5926, 1(1), pp.758-764.

Altuwaym, A., 2016. An ethnographic study of preschool classroom instructions in a Montessori school. Northeastern Illinois University.

Andrews, M.C., 2017. Supporting Conflict Resolution in an Early Childhood Montessori Environment. Pearson

Ansari, A. and Winsler, A., 2014. Montessori public school pre-K programs and the school readiness of low-income Black and Latino children. Journal of educational psychology, 106(4), p.1066.

Asmawi, A. and SeyedHendi, N., 2016. Preschool English Teachers’ Practices in Early Literacy Instruction: A Multiple Case Study. Asian Education Studies, 1(2), p.72.

Atli, S., Korkmaz, A.M., Tastepe, T. and Koksal Akyol, A., 2016. Views on Montessori Approach by Teachers Serving at Schools Applying the Montessori Approach. Eurasian Journal of Educational Research, 66, pp.123-138.

Badiei, M. and Sulaiman, T., 2014. The difference between Montessori curriculum and Malaysian national preschool curriculum on developmental skills of preschool children. British Journal of Education, Society & Behavioural Science, 4(10), pp.101372-101385.

Bahmaee, A.B., Saadatmand, Z. and Yarmohammadian, M.H., 2016. Principle Elements of Curriculum in the Preschool Pattern of Montessori. International education studies, 9(1), pp.148-153.

Banks, K. and Maixner, R.A., 2016. Social justice education in an urban charter Montessori school. Journal of Montessori Research, 2(2), pp.1-14.

Beatty, B., 2017. John dewey's high hopes for play: democracy and education and progressive era controversies over play in kindergarten and preschool education. The Journal of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era, 16(4), pp.424-437.

Ber?nik, S. and Devjak, T., 2017. Cooperation between Parents and Preschool Institutions through Different Concepts of Preschool Education. CEPS Journal: Center for Educational Policy Studies Journal, 7(4), pp.207-226.

Block, C.R., 2015. Examining a public Montessori school’s response to the pressures of high-stakes accountability. Journal of Montessori Research, 1(1), pp.42-54.

Bone, J., 2017. Maria Montessori as domestic goddess: iconic early childhood educator and material girl. Gender and Education, pp.1-15.

Brown, K.E. and Steele, A.S., 2015. Racial discipline disproportionality in Montessori and traditional public schools: A comparative study using the relative rate index. Journal of Montessori Research, 1(1), pp.14-27.

Bryman, A. and Bell, E., 2015. Business management research methods. Oxford University Press, USA.

Candler, C., Mulder, A. and Nall, K., 2014. Embedding video-based modeling handwriting instruction in a Montessori preschool phonics program. Journal of Occupational Therapy, Schools, & Early Intervention, 7(2), pp.151-160.

Christensen, O. and Gast, K., 2015. Addressing Classism in Early Childhood Education: How Social-Class Sensitive Pedagogy and the Montessori Method Can Work Together. In Discussions on Sensitive Issues (pp. 113-135). Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

Christensen, O., 2016. Proving Montessori: Identity and Dilemmas in a Montessori Teacher’s Lived Experience. Journal of Montessori Research, 2(2), pp.35-48.

Cohen, J., 2016. A Case Study of Montessori Early Childhood and Head Start Curricular Alignment. Saint Mary's College of California.

Cramer, S., 2016. The Effects of Social Stories on the Problem Solving Skills of Preschoolers. Pearson

Cunningham, C.P., 2016. Transition Strategies in Early Childhood Settings. Pearson

Danner, N. and Fowler, S., 2015. Montessori and non-Montessori early childhood teachers’ attitudes towards inclusion and access. Journal of Montessori Research, 1(1), pp.28-41.

Debs, M. and Brown, K.E., 2017. Students of color and public Montessori Schools: A review of the literature. Journal of Montessori Research, 3(1), pp.1-15.

Debs, M.C., 2016. Racial and economic diversity in US public Montessori schools. Journal of Montessori Research, 2(2), pp.15-34.

Denzin, N.K., 2017. The research act: A theoretical introduction to sociological methods. Routledge.

Dhiksha, J. and Suresh, A., 2016. Self-esteem and academic anxiety of high school students with montessori and traditional method of education. Indian Journal of Health and Wellbeing, 7(5), p.543.

Dmyrucha, A., 2015. Philosophical and pedagogical implications of maria montessori's looks in practices of preschool education. Humanities Bulletin of Zaporizhzhe State Engineering Academy, 61.

Dore, H.S., 2014. " Do You Teach Them Anything?" What Really Happens in a Montessori Toddler Class. Montessori Life: A Publication of the American Montessori Society, 26(2), pp.40-43.

Eisen, S. and Lillard, A.S., 2016. Why Montessori is a facilitative environment for theory of mind: three speculations. In Theory of Mind Development in Context (pp. 79-92). Routledge.

Elben, J. and Nicholson, T., 2017. Does learning the alphabet in kindergarten give children a head start in the first year of school? A comparison of children’s reading progress in two first grade classes in state and Montessori schools in Switzerland. Australian Journal of Learning Difficulties, 22(2), pp.95-108.

Franc, B. and Subotic, V., 2014. Differences in phonological awareness of six-year-olds from Montessori and regular program preschool institutions. In Researching paradigms of childhood and education conference book of selected papers (pp. 10-30).

Franc, B. and Subotic, V., 2015. Differences in phonological awareness of five-year-olds from Montessori and regular program preschool institutions. In Researching paradigms of childhood and education conference book of selected papers (2nd Symposium: Child language and culture) (pp. 12-20).

Garland, S., 2017. High School Should Be More Like Preschool. The Education Digest, 83(4), pp.15-21.

Gärtig-Daugs, A., Weitz, K., Wolking, M. and Schmid, U., 2016, October. Computer science experimenter's kit for use in preschool and primary school. In Proceedings of the 11th Workshop in Primary and Secondary Computing Education(pp. 66-71). ACM.

Gustafsson, C., 2018. Montessori Education. In International Handbook of Early Childhood Education (pp. 1439-1456). Springer, Dordrecht.

Hands, P.S., Sethi, R. and Engram, R., 2016,. Montessori in a Soka-Inspired Early Education Environment. In Soka Education Conference (p. 240).

Henward, A.S., 2015. (Re) imagining participant observation with preschool children. In Disrupting Early Childhood Education Research (pp. 89-101). Routledge.

Irving, S.C., 2017. Montessori Parent Education: An Action Research Report. Pearson

James, T.L., 2016. The Effects of a Collaborative Team on Early Intervention in a Preschool.

Jarvis, J., 2015. The Association Between Preschool Type and Children's Concentration Abilities. Routeledge

Johnston, C. and Marie, L., 2016. Examining a Montessori Adolescent Program through a Self-Determination Theory Lens: A Study of the Lived Experiences of Adolescents. Journal of Montessori Research, 2(1), pp.27-42.

Jones, M.R., 2016. Implementing Technology in the Primary Montessori Classroom. Pearson

Juanga, J.M.V. and Ressureccion, A.C., 2015. Comparison of Academic Performance And Attention Span Of Children Between Montessori And Traditional: Pedagogical Approaches of Preschools. In Proceedings of International Conference on Information Communication Technologies in Education (ICICTE2015) (pp. 336-347).

Kayili, G. and Ari, R., 2016. The Effect of Montessori Method Supported by Social Skills Training Program on Kindergarten Children's Skills of Understanding Feelings and Social Problem Solving. Journal of Education and Training Studies, 4(12), pp.81-91.

Kay?l?, G., 2018. The effect of Montessori method on cognitive tempo of kindergarten children. Early Child Development and Care, 188(3), pp.327-335.

Kitta, S. and Kapinga, O.S., 2015. Towards Designing Effective Preschool Education Programmes: What Can We Learn from Theories?. Journal of Education and Practice, 6(5), pp.180-185.

Laski, E.V., Vasilyeva, M. and Schiffman, J., 2016. Longitudinal Comparison of Montessori versus Non-Montessori Students’ Place-Value and Arithmetic Knowledge. Journal of Montessori Research, 2(1), pp.1-15.

Laski, E.V., Vasilyeva, M. and Schiffman, J., 2016. Longitudinal Comparison of Place-Value and Arithmetic Knowledge in Montessori and Non-Montessori Students. Journal of Montessori Research, 2(1), pp.1-15.

Lee, S.H. and Lee, L.W., 2015. Promoting snack time interactions of children with autism in preschool. Topics in Early Childhood Special Education, 35(2), pp.89-101.

Lee, Y. and Welch, G.F., 2017. Teachers’ Perceptions about the Use of Background Music in Preschool Free Play Time. Asia-Pacific Journal of Research in Early Childhood Education, 11(2), pp.85-106.

Lei, G.A.O., 2014. The Inspiration on Chinese Preschool Science Education from the Montessori Education Theory——Based on the View of Manual and Nature Education. Educational Study, 1, p.004.

Li, H., 2016. From Montessori to Reggio Emilia: A Critical Review Early Childhood Education Reform. In International Conference on Preschool Education. East China Normal University..

Lillard, A.S. and Heise, M.J., 2016. An intervention study: Removing supplemented materials from Montessori classrooms associated with better child outcomes. Journal of Montessori Research, 2(1), pp.16-26.

Lillard, A.S., 2016. Montessori: The science behind the genius. Oxford University Press.

Lillard, A.S., Heise, M.J., Richey, E.M., Tong, X., Hart, A. and Bray, P.M., 2017. Montessori preschool elevates and equalizes child outcomes: A longitudinal study. Frontiers in psychology, 8, p.1783.

Lillvist, A. and Sandberg, A., 2015. 14 Play in a preschool context. International Perspectives on Children's Play, p.175.

Lino, D.M. and Parente, C., 2018. Play and Learning in Early Childhood Education: The Contribution of High Scope, Reggio Emilia, and Montessori Pedagogical Approaches. In Early Childhood Education From an Intercultural and Bilingual Perspective (pp. 147-163). IGI Global.

Lynch, L., 2017. A Space Apart: Enabling the Creation of a Withdrawal Space in the Preschool. SAGE Open, 7(1), p.21.

Marshall, C., 2017. Montessori education: a review of the evidence base. npj Science of Learning, 2(1), p.11.

Mei, Y.U.A.N. and Zhi-yong, N.I., 2015. Restudy on Historical Contribution of Montessori's Education Thoughts. Comparative Education Review, 2, p.013.

Mitchel, A.L. and Mead, S., 2017. The Charter Model Goes to Preschool. Education Next, 17(1).

Nitecki, E., 2015. Integrated school-family partnerships in preschool: Building quality involvement through multidimensional relationships. School Community Journal, 25(2), p.195.

Pate, R.R., O'Neill, J.R., Byun, W., McIver, K.L., Dowda, M. and Brown, W.H., 2014. Physical activity in preschool children: comparison between Montessori and traditional preschools. Journal of School Healthcare, 84(11), pp.716-721.

Pearson, L., 2016. Inuit Early Child Care Centres. Canadian Journal of Children's Rights/Revue canadienne des droits des enfants, 3(1), pp.142-148.

Peng, H.H., 2014. Do children in Montessori schools perform better in the achievement test? A Taiwanese perspective. International Journal of Early Childhood, 46(2), pp.299-311.

Prince, J., Scholar, M. and Schaub, M., 2014. Buying Early Education: The Role of Parental Motivation in Preschool Consumption. The Penn State McNair Journal, p.123.

Pruit, J.C., 2014. Preconstructing suspicion and recasting masculinity in preschool settings. Qualitative Research in Education, 3(3), pp.320-344.

Pruit, J.C., 2015. Preschool teachers and the discourse of suspicion. Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, 44(4), pp.510-534.

Rajan, R.S., 2017. Music education in Montessori schools: An exploratory study of school directors’ perceptions in the United States. International Journal of Music Education, 35(2), pp.227-238.

Rani, P.B. and Shekhar, R., 2018. Self Esteem and Job Satisfaction Among Preschool Educators. Advanced Science Letters, 24(1), pp.314-316.

Reed, S., 2017. Gross Motor in the Preschool Classroom. Pearson

Ruijs, N., 2017. The effects of Montessori education: evidence from admission lotteries. Economics of Education Review, 61, pp.19-34.

Ruiz, R.M., Sommer, E.C., Tracy, D., Banda, J.A., Economos, C.D., JaKa, M.M., Evenson, K.R., Buchowski, M.S. and Barkin, S.L., 2018. Novel patterns of physical activity in a large sample of preschool-aged children. BMC public health, 18(1), p.242.

Schacter, J. and Jo, B., 2016. Improving low-income preschoolers mathematics achievement with Math Shelf, a preschool tablet computer curriculum. Computers in Human Behavior, 55, pp.223-229.

Schlechter, C.R., Rosenkranz, R.R., Fees, B.S. and Dzewaltowski, D.A., 2017. Preschool daily patterns of physical activity driven by location and social context. Journal of school health, 87(3), pp.194-199.

Sebastian, K. and Matheen, W., 2016. A Comparison of Montessori and Traditional School Children on Cognitive Development. The International Journal of Indian Psychology, Volume 4, Issue 1, No. 81, p.32.

Sekaran, U. and Bougie, R., 2016. Research methods for business: A skill building approach. John Wiley & Sons.

Silva, M., 2018. Early childhood education and care: An overview of preschool education. In International Perspectives on Early Childhood Education and Care (pp. 34-41). Routledge.

Siraj-Blatchford, J. and Emerson, S., 2017. The legacy of Maria Montessori. In Understanding Sustainability in Early Childhood Education (pp. 151-170). Routledge.

Sisson, J.H. and Kroeger, J., 2017. ‘They get enough of play at home’: a Bakhtinian interpretation of the dialogic space of public school preschool. Early Child Development and Care, 187(5-6), pp.812-826.

Smith, J.A. ed., 2015. Qualitative psychology: A practical guide to research methods. Sage.

Taylor, S.J., Bogdan, R. and DeVault, M., 2015. Introduction to qualitative research methods: A guidebook and resource. John Wiley & Sons.

Torres, A.M.T. and Tran, T.C., 2014. The Impact of Parent Involvement on Preschool English Language Learners' Ability to Learn the English Language.

Valdez, S.B., 2017. The Effect of Handwriting Without Tears on Montessori Four-year-olds' Handwriting Ability.

Vale, S., Trost, S.G., Duncan, M.J. and Mota, J., 2015. Step based physical activity guidelines for preschool-aged children. Preventive medicine, 70, pp.78-82.

Vms.lt. 2018. Private Vilnius Montessori pre-school. Kindergarten in Vilnius. [online] Available at: https://vms.lt/ [Accessed 5 May 2018].

Wingo, L., Banks, R. and Young, S., 2018. Making Music with Maria Montessori: A Pedagogical Analysis of Montessori’s Methodology.

Winsor, D. and Spatariu, A., 2014. A MOBI Case Study: Teachers Acclimating to Technology in a Preschool Classroom. In E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education(pp. 2069-2079). Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE).

Wolf, G.M., 2016. Sound Reading: Teaching Preschool Children Print-to-Sound Processing. Early childhood education journal, 44(1), pp.11-19.

Cite This Work

To export a reference to this article please select a referencing stye below:

My Assignment Help. (2019). The Essay On The Sustainability Of Early Childhood Education Highlights The Importance Of Montessori Programs. (70 Characters). Retrieved from https://myassignmenthelp.com/free-samples/sustainability-early-childhood-education.

"The Essay On The Sustainability Of Early Childhood Education Highlights The Importance Of Montessori Programs. (70 Characters)." My Assignment Help, 2019, https://myassignmenthelp.com/free-samples/sustainability-early-childhood-education.

My Assignment Help (2019) The Essay On The Sustainability Of Early Childhood Education Highlights The Importance Of Montessori Programs. (70 Characters) [Online]. Available from: https://myassignmenthelp.com/free-samples/sustainability-early-childhood-education
[Accessed 15 July 2024].

My Assignment Help. 'The Essay On The Sustainability Of Early Childhood Education Highlights The Importance Of Montessori Programs. (70 Characters)' (My Assignment Help, 2019) <https://myassignmenthelp.com/free-samples/sustainability-early-childhood-education> accessed 15 July 2024.

My Assignment Help. The Essay On The Sustainability Of Early Childhood Education Highlights The Importance Of Montessori Programs. (70 Characters) [Internet]. My Assignment Help. 2019 [cited 15 July 2024]. Available from: https://myassignmenthelp.com/free-samples/sustainability-early-childhood-education.

Get instant help from 5000+ experts for
question

Writing: Get your essay and assignment written from scratch by PhD expert

Rewriting: Paraphrase or rewrite your friend's essay with similar meaning at reduced cost

Editing: Proofread your work by experts and improve grade at Lowest cost

loader
250 words
Phone no. Missing!

Enter phone no. to receive critical updates and urgent messages !

Attach file

Error goes here

Files Missing!

Please upload all relevant files for quick & complete assistance.

Plagiarism checker
Verify originality of an essay
essay
Generate unique essays in a jiffy
Plagiarism checker
Cite sources with ease
support
Whatsapp
callback
sales
sales chat
Whatsapp
callback
sales chat
close