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WHS Management System Review

Discuss about the Implement and Monitor WHS Policies, Procedures and Programs to Meet Legislative Requirement.

The University of Sydney has all the procedures which ensure that the students, affiliates and staff of the university are never exposed to the health and safety hazards and risks in the workplace or the premises on the university. Such regulations and procedures have been formulated in a way that they comply with the work health and safety policy 2016. It is worth mentioning that the basic purpose of work health and safety legislation is to ensure that employers systematically manage risks which arise from hazards in the workplace. The employers have the responsibility to effectively consult and communicate the risks and health hazards to the employees. It can be stated that the risk management system of the University of Sydney has been developed in a way which assists the university for the purpose of achieving compliance with the health and safety regulations and legislation. This system imposes the responsibility on the managers and the staff members of the university to oversee the activities of the students and other staff. It is worth mentioning that the process Work health and Safety risk management in the University of Sydney involves five steps. They are:

  • Identification of the hazards and the jobs that are hazardous
  • Assessing the priority for the each of the hazardous jobs and the hazards
  • Assessing the risks associated with the hazardous acts and jobs
  • Controlling the risks for the purpose of fixing the problems
  • Periodic evaluation of the risk management systems for the purpose of checking whether the risks are being managed effectively.

It can be mentioned that the university has a checklist to assess whether the managers and the supervisors are fulfilling their responsibilities. It is necessary for the managers and the supervisors of the university to:

  • Act as a good leader
  • Identify the health risks and the hazards which might affect the health and the safety of the students
  • Control, eliminate and assess the risks in accordance with the guidelines of the University’s health and Safety regulations and procedures.
  • Provide training to the staff which is required to eliminate and minimize the risks
  • Investigate the accidents which occur within the premises of the university and identify the root causes so as to prevent the reoccurrence of such accidents
  • Refer to the concerned personnel for tackling the work health and safety issues which cannot be managed locally. The methods for workplace inspections by the concerned personnel include dividing the different departments of the school and the different areas for inspection. The managers and executives are also required to nominate staff for the purpose of completing the inspection and are also required to schedule dates for inspection. They are also required to use an inspection checklist for the purpose of recording the results of the inspections.  Further it can be stated that local supervisors and inspectors are required to resolve the hazards which are obvious if such inspectors and local supervisors have the capability of doing so.

Overview of WHS Acts and regulations the University of Sydney has addressed them in the WHS management system. Supported by national legislations and regulations. The University of Sydney has a comprehensive WHS which is binding to senate committees, staff, students all affiliates including volunteers and contractors. The University in its statement of intent is committed to the health and safety of all who operate in the university.

The 2016 WHS policy champions the enforcement of safety provisions in line with the Australian Capital Territory, Work and Healthy Safety Act 2011 under the Legislation Act 2001. The University’s WHS Acts are reviewed every four years. It has different facets that include the following.

University of Sydney WHS safety management system

The implementation of the safety program ensures strict guidelines and regulations are clearly outlined. The guidelines have set expectations dealing with specific risks and hazards. The WHS plan for the University’s safety is thought out and drafted with guidance from the University’s Senate.

Overview of WHS Acts and Regulations

The operation standards for the University’s WHS management are in line with the Work and Healthy Safety Act 2011 in the following ways.

  • Acts 16 (a) and (b) which like the University WHS section (9) has identified different set of groups in the university and grouped them in a way that ensures effective management of risks and hazards. This clustering of students, lecturers and workers ensures that each distinct group is taken care of in case of an emergency.  
  • Leadership in each management unit is also visible and monitored in implementation of the given safety measures with clear communication channels.
  • University staffs are also continuously trained on the best WHS skills and interventions as explained in section 9 (e). This is in connection to Act 21 (1) and (2). Act 21 (a) demands for a mandatory five days training in WHS standards. Act 21 (b) requires all employees in the WHS department to have one refresher course each year.
  • WHS staffs are expected to promptly notify and clearly record any incident that has caused or may cause harm to anyone in the university. This is in line with the legislation Act 22(a), (b) and (c) which have very strict penalties if incidents aren’t reported or resolved immediately.
  • To manage incidents effectively, it is a requirement that proper procurement of the best facilities be purchased by the university procurement. This will ensure that the university is well prepared to effectively take care of any incidents or occurrences.

The university’s ultimate policy is for each and every individual in the university to ensure they are safe at all times. Although for this policy to be effective it has been broken down to manageable units with guidelines coming from the senate and implemented at different faculties and sections of the university.

Using the university’s performance and planning frame work, WHS the university is able to monitor safety progress. Heads of different administrative units are required to analysis the WHS development and set new targets every year to ensure constant improvement. The monitoring process should also enforce enforcement of resolved measures to ensure WHS policies are adhered.

How the university’s Work Health and Safety Policy helps it maintain its legal and regulatory obligations (National).

The university WHS policy of 2016 drafted by supervision from the university’s senate has provisions that are in line with the Work and Healthy Safety Act 2011. This ensures that all legal and regulatory obligations are maintained. Different sections of the WHS for the University act enforce legislations that are legally binding.

Legal obligations in the University’s WHS management system

  • The University’s senate being a legal entity recognized by the law and the university has the authority to oversee the drafting and implementation of WHS management system. This ensures that all resolutions passed by the senate are legally binding.
  • Policies and procedures for the university WHS are in line with the WHS Acts (2.1) which recognizes different entities like faculties, students and staff in its procedures and policies.
  • The operation standards in the University WHS are drafted to meet all the university’s and legal provisions. This means standards cannot be modified to meet individual expectations but must be legal.
  • Clearly defined risks and hazards in the University’s WHS meet the same definitions in the Work and Healthy Safety Act 2011. This makes interpretation and implementation easy. In case of disputes, the university senate can refer to the Work and Healthy Safety Act 2011 which is recognized by law in interpretation hazards and risks.
  • Shared and personal responsibilities are clearly outlined in the university WHS. These responsibilities are for managers, supervisors and the general university community. The Work and Healthy Safety Act 2011 has clearly defined how individuals in different set ups are expected to react in cases of emergencies.
  • Training and capacity building for WHS staff and the general university community regarding WHS are in line with legal provisions in the Work and Healthy Safety Act 2011. The curriculum and operational procedures approved by the senate have to comply with the Work and Healthy Safety Act 2011.
  • Monitoring and implementation procedure for WHS programs are also in line with the Work and Healthy Safety Act 2011. The safety evaluation template has to follow the Work and Healthy Safety Act 2011 template. This helps in ensuring quality WHS monitoring and evaluation standards are maintained at all times.

Overview of university’s hazard identification and risk management system

The University of Sydney hazard identification and risk management has a four facet approach described in the code of operation.

  • Identification of the risk and hazards. This analyzes the cause and reason for the occurrence and origin of the risk.
  • Risk assessment; Analysis of the extent to which the occurrence occurs and the likely hood of it being repeated. This also looks to what extents can the hazard or risk is harmful or dangerous.
  • Interventions and control: How best can the risks and hazards be controlled or prevented from happening. This takes different approaches depending on the type of risk or hazard. The university uses the WHS training manual to implement learnt intervention measures to different risks and hazards.
  • Reviewing implementation and monitoring operations; to be effective in risks and hazards management, the university constantly reviews WHS procedures as they are being reviewed in the Work and Healthy Safety Act 2011. Technology innovations and new research and knowledge are always being implemented to ensure good safety measures are maintained at all times.

Hazards and risks have been identified and clustered into groups for ease of management and prevention in the university. This process helps the WHS team to be prepared to each identified risk much better. The risks and hazards are as follows.

  • Chemicals: Classification of chemicals depends on the nature of danger a chemical possess. Some chemicals found in the university workshops, offices and laboratories are more dangerous than others. Chemical interventions and management depend on the degree of harm and the degree of reaction of the particular chemical.
  • Confined spaces: These are areas that are not meant for people to work or stay. They are characterized with poor ventilation or entry and exit points. These are spaces that are also prone to fire outbreaks. Rescue missions in these areas are usually challenging.  
  • Electricity: This is the most common form of risk and hazard in most institutions. To prevent electricity hazards, the university conducts periodic inspections and does repairs to its electricity system. Electricity appliances like generators and machines are also of very high risk.
  • Ergonomics: Students and lectures in the university spend most of their time reading and studying. Sitting down for long periods of time can create fatigue and affect the muscle structure. To ensure healthy work environment, the university has put in places desks and seats in the workstations that are not hazardous to the body system.
  • Events: Occasions like students’ symposiums, sports and graduations pose a great deal of hazardous situations. The university has put in place measures to ensure that during events in the university safety measures are put in place to prevent any harmful incidents from taking place. In case of risks during events, the university through its WHS team is able to contain the situation promptly.
  • Falls:  This involves workers working in the university. Climbing buildings or structures can create risky avenues with devastating injuries if a person falls. Workers are always advised to wear protective gears and take personal measures for their own safety.
  • Sun protection:  Research has shown that Australia has the highest levels of skin cancer. The university has put measures in place to ensure that students, staff and workers in the university are protected from severe sun heat.
  • Manual handling: Using force to move or lift machines and objects can pose health risks to an individual. The university has many employees and students who engage in physical manual activities. To prevent bodily harm, the university has automated most of the services and also put measures to reduce risks associated with manual handling.

Conduct and Report on a WHS Audit

WHS audit checklist for the university’s workstation

The following is not an exhaustive list but a framework to guide workplace inspections. Each workplace may wish to develop a site specific checklist. For review of workplace safety systems use the OHS self assessment tool.

Team Members: ________________________________________________________________________________________

Date of Inspection: ______________________________________________________________________________________

Location (e.g. General Assistant’s Area/Workroom/Art room): ____________________________________________________

* Further action required: (i) Risk Management Plan (ii) Hazard Report form (iii) Incident Investigation (iv) Other

Acceptable

Immediate action taken

Further action required*

Date signed off

Date to be completed

Y

N

Thoroughfares (access and egress)

Pathways/walkways/stairs/ramps and access areas clear of rubbish and obstructions

N

Cleaning them from time to time

Ensuing the areas are free of rubbish and obstruction

2-06-2018

Pathways/walkways are slip free. Surfaces are even, free of holes, cracks, fraying or uplifted edges

Y

Slip resistant materials or absorbent mats used in wet areas

Y

Steps/stairs/ramps/handrails are secure and in good repair

Y

Electrical cables/cords kept clear of walkways or secured

Y

Exit and egress points clearly identified and accessible

Y

Other:

Y

Office environment (workstations and surrounding areas)

Ergonomic furniture is appropriately adjusted e.g. keyboards, chairs

Y

Furniture is well maintained and in good/safe condition

N

Renovating old furniture

Replacing the unsafe furniture with new and safe furniture

Desks and benches stable and suitable for the work

Y

Materials are stored appropriately e.g. not on floor around work areas

N

Materials which are hazardous or likely to cause harm to the students and the staff

Ensure that hazardous materials are stored in places which pose no threat to anyone

Staff use good housekeeping practices around their work areas

Y

Sufficient space is provided around workstations so staff can move and work safely

Y

Walkways and aisles are clear of obstructions

Y

Floor mats do not present trip hazards

Y

Lifting aids are available where required

Y

Electrical equipment is in good working order

Y

Electrical leads are secured to prevent trip hazards

Y

Adequate ventilation in all areas

Y

Other:

Y

Storage

Storerooms and storage areas are tidy and free from obstruction

Y

Stored materials are secured appropriately to prevent them falling

Y

Heavy equipment is stored at waist level

Y

Storage areas are accessible and free from trip hazards

Y

Shelving is stable and well maintained

Y

Other:

Y

Acceptable

Immediate action taken

Further action required*

Date signed off

Date to be completed

Y

N

Electrical

All power boards have an overload switch

Y

Portable power leakage circuits checked and functioning correctly

Y

All electrical cables free of possible contact with water or other conductors

Y

Double adaptors are not used in conjunction with other double adaptors or extension leads

Y

No leads placed where subject to damage e.g. heat or cutting

Y

No broken plugs, sockets or switches

Y

Other:

Y

Master controls – whole workplace

Perimeter fences and safety barriers in place and maintained

Y

Access by delivery vehicles and other vehicles safe for pedestrians

Y

Rubbish is stored appropriately and removed regularly

Y

Building/renovation areas and contained debris are controlled through effective barriers against unauthorised access

Y

Other:

Y

Bathrooms and toilets

Adequate and clean toilet facilities and supplies

Y

Toilets provided for people with disability

Y

Toilet and bathroom facilities cleaned regularly

Y

Paper towels or air dryers available and working

Y

Toilet paper available with spare rolls readily accessible

Y

Sanitary towel disposal units in female toilets

Y

Facilities well ventilated

Y

Other:

Y

Canteen

Appropriate hand washing facilities are available

Y

Safety guidelines/rules are clearly displayed

Y

To prevent slips and trips, all areas are kept clean and free of waste or obstructions

Y

Access to canteen equipment is restricted to relevant staff

Y

Other:

Y

Hygiene

Common rooms clean and tidy

Y

Food preparation areas clean and hygienic

Y

Fridges and food storage areas kept clean and hygienic

Y

Adequate drinking facilities

Y

Other:

Y

Room heaters, air conditioners and ventilation

Heating and cooling units effective for the work area

Y

Heaters in good working condition

Y

Heaters situated clear of flammable items

Y

Photocopiers are placed in well ventilated areas

Y

Other:

Y

Acceptable

Immediate action taken

Further action required*

Date signed off

Date to be completed

Y

N

Plant, machinery and equipment

All fixed machines are secured on their mountings and free from movement and vibration

Y

Adequate workspace is marked around danger zones of each item of plant to ensure safety

Y

All machines and equipment have adequate guards fitted as per manufacturers instructions

Y

All items checked to ensure that guards have not been modified and are being used effectively e.g. circular saws, guillotines, lathes, tractors etc

Y

Emergency cut-off switches operational and within close proximity to users

Y

Safety procedures, Standard operating Procedures and related signage is prominently displayed

Y

Areas around machines are kept clear of debris and stacked material

Y

Records of equipment inspection, maintenance and repair are available

Y

Other:

Y

Hazardous substances (chemical safety)

The hazardous substances register is up to date

Y

MSDSs available to all staff online (ChemWatch website)

Y

All chemicals are secured from unauthorised access

Y

All chemicals are stored correctly according to MSDSs and CSIS guidelines

Y

Decanted chemicals are placed in suitable containers and correctly labelled

Y

Chemical storerooms are locked and signs prohibiting unauthorised personnel from entering are in place

Y

Only minimal quantities of chemicals are kept on site

Y

Dangerous Goods licence checklist and declaration has been completed

Y

Spill kits are readily available to control chemical spills

Y

All records on the acquisition, storage and disposal of hazardous substances are maintained as per CSIS

Y

Other:

Y

Personal protective equipment (PPE)

All PPE is stored appropriately

Y

All PPE is checked and maintained appropriately e.g. cleaned or replaced as required

Y

Sun Safety procedures and No Hat No Play policy is practiced

Y

Other:

Y

Gas cylinders

Gas cylinders are secured from unauthorised access

Y

Gas cylinders have expiry date stamp

Y

Cylinders are in good condition i.e. no rusting, damage

Y

Other:

Y

Acceptable

Immediate action taken

Further action required*

Date signed off

Date to be completed

Y

N

Technology learning environment

PPE is supplied appropriate to the task and the user

Y

Plant, equipment and furniture arranged to allow safe movement within the area

Y

Dust or fume extraction equipment connected to all appropriate equipment and serviced regularly

Y

Ventilation systems such as windows and fans functioning correctly

Y

Darkrooms have fume extraction systems and photographic chemicals are correctly labelled

Y

Safety screens for welding etc are accessible and in good condition

Y

Other:

Y

Housekeeping

All work spaces are clear, tidy and free of obstruction and waste

Y

All displays, hanging or posted, are without risk

Y

Appropriate aids available for work being carried out e.g. steps/ladders, trolleys

Y

OHS Corporate Policy is displayed on staff noticeboard(s)

Y

OHS Consultation Statement is displayed

Y

List of OHS Committee Members or OHS Representative is displayed

Y

Minutes of OHS Committee Meetings is displayed in staff room

Y

The Reporting OHS Incidents and Injuries brochure is displayed in staff rooms

Y

Dignity and Respect Charter is displayed in staff areas

Y

EAP information and brochures are displayed and available to staff

Y

WorkCover “Watching out for you” poster is displayed

Y

Other:

Y

First aid

First Aid Plan is displayed on noticeboard(s)

Y

First aid arrangements are displayed, including name and location of first aid officer

Y

Appropriate first aid kits are available and easily accessible with signs clearly visible

Y

A current record of all first aid treatment is kept

Y

First aid room, sick bay or clinic is available

Y

First aid arrangements are displayed, including name and location of first aid officer

Y

First aid kits are checked regularly to ensure they are clean, orderly, fully stocked and not expired

Y

Standard precautions for infection control are displayed and hand washing facilities are available

Y

Medication associated with student health care are securely stored

Y

Other:

Y

Acceptable

Immediate action taken

Further action required*

Date signed off

Date to be completed

Y

N

Emergency management

Emergency Management Plan and procedures are displayed on noticeboard(s)

Y

Emergency evacuation exercise is undertaken in accordance with the Emergency Management plan

Y

Emergency lockdown is practiced in accordance with the Emergency Management Plan

Y

Alarm is audible throughout the workplace

Y

Emergency numbers are clearly displayed

Y

Bomb threat procedures are displayed appropriately

Y

Entrances and exits are clearly identified and kept free of obstruction

Y

Emergency equipment (e.g. fire extinguishers) is located appropriately and regularly tested and tagged to ensure it’s in good working order

Y

Emergency numbers (Poisons hotline etc) displayed

Y

Other:

Y

Fire safety

Access to all fire safety equipment unobstructed

Y

Fire extinguishers mounted on the wall, signs located above them, fully charged and accessible

Y

Emergency equipment (e.g. fire extinguishers) has been tested, tagged and current

Y

Fire blanket required

Y

Fire and sprinkler heads clear of obstructions

Y

Clear instructions displayed for evacuation

Y

Adequate direction signs for emergency exits

Y

Fire doors and emergency exits clear of obstruction

Y

Correct operation of fire doors

Y

Other:

Y

Portfolio Level Due diligence Audit Tool (T1)

Academic Faculties

SMS Audit Tool (T2)

Provast and Dvc

 1st Year 2016

2nd Year 2017

3rd Year 2018

4th Year 2019

Business School

Architecture

IT

Engineering

Education

Law

Regulation 40: The work environment and recommendations of measures in the audit

Individuals and WHS department must ensure that the workstation meets the following guidelines in the work environment.

  • Entry and exit points: They must be easily accessible at all times by everyone in the workstation. This will ensure ease of access to people by the rescue team in case of an emergency. The doors should take into consideration people with special needs requirements. Corridors should be 600mm wide and not have any items that can prevent free movement of people. There should also be separate entry and exit points for machines and heavy assets that is separate from the one used by students and staff. Doors that use security codes and electricity should allow emergency response buttons to alert administrators in case of power failure. The exit and entry doors should be clearly indicated. This allows free movement of people without causing any confusion during movement.
  • Floors and other surfaces:These must be made in a way that allows easy movement of people in the work place. Floors should not be too slippery or very rough. Floors should be inspected regularly and maintained in good conditions. Workers using metallic or sharp pointed tools and machines should ensure that they protect the floor surface’s they are working on to prevent damage. Offices should ensure if they are able that floors are carpeted to aid in easy movement of people and to also reduce noise generated from people walking and objects falling on the floor. Work stations that have moving equipment like trolleys should be wooden or tiled to prevent friction.
  • Lighting:Appropriate lighting should be in the work station to allow work to be carried out effectively. Too much or little light can cause eye sight problems to the people working in the particular work environment. The type of lighting to be used should also be determined depending on the type of work that is being carried out. This should also consider if there are reflections in the work place that might interfere with the lighting. Natural light illumination should also be taken into consideration so as not to interfere with artificial lighting.
  • Air quality:The work environment should be well ventilated to allow free flow of air. Suffocated or too much air in the work station may cause health hazards to the workers in a particular work station. The workstation should also be prevented from having bad smell and odors. These are usually caused due to lack of sufficient circulation of air. Ventilation should consist of permanent ventilation openings like windows. Air conditioning and other ventilation machines used should also be constantly serviced and maintained.
  • Heat and cold: Temperatures in the workstation should be appropriate. Too hot or cold temperature will adversely affect the health of workers and may cause health problems. Depending on the type of work, temperatures must not interfere with the working conditions of a person. Temperatures can also be affected depending on the season of the year. Like during winter, heaters should be installed and also during summer, coolers and air conditioners should be used to stabilize temperatures.
  • Toilets:Toilets should cater for both genders and also take into consideration people living with disabilities. The standard ratio for toilets is usually 1:20 depending on the number of people in a particular work station. Toilets should also be fit with all the necessary equipment for hygienic purposes. Accessibility of toilets should also be near to the workstations to prevent people from walking long distances to access the facility. WHS’s should also procure mobile toilet facilities to be used for outdoor events and activities.
  • Hand washing:Sinks and washing areas should be put in strategic places in the work place to ensure personal hygiene is maintained. Sensitive areas of considerations like toilets and dining areas should disinfectants and soaps to guarantee maximum safety. The sinks should be separated from other washing troughs used for manual works. Also hot and cold water taps should be in place to cater for different preferences.

Appropriate internal consultation and reporting process to communicate the WHS/OHS matters identified

WHS/OHS Standards

Reporting and consultation process of communicating WHS/OHS matters is a legal obligation under the OHS Act of 2004. The communication process entails the following.

  • Reporting on hazards and risks identified in the workplace.
  • Resolutions reached on the roadmap to deal with hazards and risk in the workplace.
  • Recommendations for the best ways to monitor and implement risk mitigation measures in the workplace.
  • Review of job descriptions and redeployment of staff to areas that need more WHS attention.
  • The communication should also ensure that all legal requirements have been meet and appropriately reported in the communication.

It’s the duty of the supervisors or line managers to ensure the communications are in line with the following.

  • Report on the findings of the WHS audit
  • According to the audit report on recommendations and changes that have to be put in place.
  • Give a detailed report on the findings of the WHS work place inspection.
  • Provide an outline of all the risks identified in the inspection.

Implementation of communicated information

The university being big with different faculties and departments, the best way to implement communicated is through clustering. This can be small groups of individuals sharing common classes or workstations. This according to the 2004 Act is called Designated Work Group. The DWG groups are determined by the number of employees in the work place. The number of employees who perform similar tasks and the nature of hazards involved in the particular duty to be carried out.

How to determine effective communication channels

  • WHS Committees: This a structured team with a supervisor. Communicating through the committee ensures the information is received and implemented.
  • Email Updates: This is very effective as it ensures information is circulated to all the group members.
  • Newsletter: Digital or hard copy newsletter can be distributed to staff and students.
  • Intranet: Information can be uploaded on the university website. This information can only be accessed to the university fraternity.

Suggested training needs of the staff, if required, to meet OHS requirements

According WHS 2011 Act is mandatory for organizations to conduct continuous training and awareness to students, workers and staff in the university. The training contains the following OHS objectives.

  • Generic OHS Training
  • Risk specific Training
  • Task specific OHS Training

An overview of the new WHS legislation

The objective of the new legislation is to provide a nationalistic approach to safety and health awareness in workplaces and to all individuals. This framework contains the following approach.

  • Legally protecting workers from any hazards and risks that may happen in the course of duty.
  • Encouraging work groups and workers unions to be incorporated into WHS programs.
  • Advising all WHS remembers on legal and procedural obligations.

The audit found out the workplace was safe and meet all the WHS standards and procedures. The only challenge was in maintain the standards and being alert for any unforeseen risks or hazards that may arise and be contained appropriately.

To recommend hazard identification procedure for the Virginia campus WHS audit has to be carried out following the laid out procedures outlined above.

  1. Visible and Active leadership
  • Work Health and Safety is the primary concern with respect to team management and meetings
  • At least once in every thirty days safety leadership has to be demonstrated by senior managers by engaging with the employees. For instance having informal safety conversations with the employees
  • Supervisors and managers have to be involved actively in the process of risk management
  1. Planning for Safety
  • Through the use of table 1 the five primary hazardous task or hazards are identified and recorded. All the operational activities needs to be taken into consideration
  • Through appendix 1 the five primary hazardous task or hazards are prioritized and assessed using the risk matrix and applicable controls which are used to reduce or eliminate risks
  • For the purpose of addressing prior WHS issues resources are allocated
  • Individuals are assigned with actions which they need to complete within a reasonable time frame.
  • The progress in relation to the attainment of planned activity is to be reported to senior mangers regularly.

Top 5 Hazards

Reference

Hazardous Tasks and Hazards

Examples

Present risk prevention measures

Rating for Risks

(In light of present prevention methods)

I

Rubbish and obstruction on the stare care

Slippery stairway

Warning Signs  and slip resistant material coating

1

II

Pathway having Ergonomic Furniture

Keyboards and chairs are not adjusted appropriately

Furniture is kept is safe conditions and is maintained regularly

2

III

Walkways having electric cords and cables

Secured cables

Clearly demarcating the exit points

3

  1. Participation and consultation
  • Opportunities are provided to workers and high degree research students so that they are able to express their views and participate in decisions which may have an impact on their safety
  • Issues relating to WHS which are raised by the workers and staff are to be responsively handled by the mangers who are to provide feedback within appropriate time
  • The health and safety representative who are elected in relation to the workgroups are invited to attend management meetings so that they can participate on the WHS management decisions
  1. Risk Management
  • The assessment and identification of the hazardous task or hazards is done by application of risk management steps
  • Medium and high risks activities as given in appendix 1 have to be provided with attention along with risk  groups
    Primary hazardous task or hazards are attempted to be eliminated
  • In situation where elimination cannot be done risk prevention methods are deployed in relation to hierarchy of control
  • ‘High’ as well as ‘Very High’ risk actions are generally subjected to the safe working procedures and documented risk assessments.
  • To ensure the effectiveness of implemented risk controls, they are being monitored regularly and at least, annually.
  • Inspections are being carried out at the workplaces regularly and at least, quarterly.
  1. WHS instruction and training
  • Within the first week at their workplaces, the HDR students along with the new workers should complete WHS induction.
  • New workers and students must receive induction sessions before given accessibility to the workplaces.
  • Staff members need to complete WHS for supervisors and managers training course before getting the responsibility of managing other staffs or HDR students.
  • Supervisors review the workers’ training needs as well as assign them with relevant WHS training regularly or at least annually.
  • Workers including students get instructions on appropriate SWPs and are provided with constant supervision.
  1. Emergency management
  • For emergency purpose, the local emergency wardens or first aiders are being appointed.
  • The workers including students are being given with training opportunities in order to practice and perform emergency procedures.
  • Details of the local emergency wardens are being communicated within the work groups (example; local websites, signage)
  • Workers along with the students are given reminders of reviewing University Emergency Planning Guidelines on regular or annual intervals.
  • The exercises of emergency evacuation procedures are being conducted regularly or at least annual intervals.
  1. Incident or Hazard management and reporting
  • All the workers including students have sound knowledge on reporting about hazardous incidents.
  • Hazards and incidents are reported immediately to the supervisors, which are recorded formally within 24 hours in RiskWare.
  1. Suppliers, purchasing and contractors controls
  • The hazards which are related to the materials or equipments are being taken under consideration.
  • Several attempts are being made while purchasing the safest services and products.
  • The mandatory selection criterion is safety especially during tender and quote evaluation procedures.
  • The specifications of service contract typically involve safety performance indicators and performance requirements.
  • The service contractors are being qualified and that too, in an appropriate manner.

Potential Consequences

L6

L5

L4

L3

L2

Minor discomfort or injuries. No measureable physical effects or medical treatment.

Medical treatment requirements during illness or injuries. Temporary impairment.

Requirements of hospital admission during illness or injuries.

Illness or injuries resulting into permanent impairment.

Fatality

Not Significant

Minor

Moderate

Major

Severe

Likelihood

Expected to happen under usual circumstances, regularly.

Medium

High

Very High

Very High

Very High

Expected to take place at times

Medium

High

High

Very High

Very High

May happen at times

Low

Medium

High

High

Very High

Not likely to take place in usual circumstances

Low

Low

Medium

Medium

High

Can occur, but possibly never will

Low

Low

Low

Low

Medium

References

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MacEachen, E., Kosny, A., Scott-Dixon, K., Facey, M., Chambers, L., Breslin, C., Kyle, N., Irvin, E. and Mahood, Q., 2010. Workplace health understandings and processes in small businesses: a systematic review of the qualitative literature. Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation, 20(2), pp.180-198.

WHS Governance Structure

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WHS/OHS Standards

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